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SJHH ... / Mental Health & Addiction Services/ Mental Health Services/ Psychology Training/ Psychology Residency Program/ Faculty and Supervisors

Faculty and Supervisors

Core Faculty includes registered psychologists who provide supervision on major rotations. A subset of the core faculty sit on the Residency Program Training Committee, and all are involved in teaching didactic seminars.

Adjunct Faculty include psychologists who are less directly involved in resident supervision or who are currently working under supervised practice as well as other individuals from a variety of disciplines. They are involved in teaching didactic seminars to psychology residents and in some cases, provide clinical and research supervision.

Core Faculty

All
Peter J. Bieling, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Peter J. Bieling, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Director-Mood and Anxiety Services, Geriatric Services,
and Quality and Evaluation (Mental Health and Addictions)
West 5th Campus

Tel:  905-522-1155, ext. 36403
Fax:  905-521-6120
E-mail:  pbieling@stjoes.ca

Dr. Bieling received his Ph.D. in 1997 from the University of British Columbia, and completed his internship at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), in Toronto and a post-doctoral fellowship under Aaron T. Beck at the University of Pennsylvania in 1998. He is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences and the Director, Mood & Anxiety Services and Geriatric Services at St. Joseph's Healthcare. Dr. Bieling's research and clinical focus is on empirically supported interventions in Mood Disorders and Cognitive Behavioural treatments. He also leads the Quality and Evaluation Service Team (QUEST) a joint venture of the Mental Health and Addiction Program at St. Joseph's Healthcare and the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University. QUEST attempts to bring carefully designed research methodologies to questions related to program effectiveness and real world clinical dilemmas. Data generated from these efforts then assists the program in establishing priorities and making modifications to service delivery. Dr. Bieling is coordinator for CBT depression training in the psychiatry residency program and a Founding Fellow in the Academy of Cognitive Therapy.

Selected Publications:

Bieling, P. J., Hawley, L. L., Bloch, R. T., Corcoran, K. M., Levitan, R. D., Young, L. T., MacQueen, G. M., & Segal, Z. V. (In Press).  Treatment-Specific Changes in Decentering Following Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy Versus Antidepressant Medication or Placebo for Prevention of Depressive Relapse.Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology

Green, S. M., Bieling, P. J. (2012). Expanding the scope of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy: Evidence for effectiveness in a heterogeneous psychiatric sample. Cognitive Behavioral Practice, 19, 174-180.

Bieling, P. J. (2011). Is it medication versus mindfulness in prevention of depression relapse? Neuropsychiatry, 1, 97-99.

Wheeler, H.A., Blankstein, K. R., Antony, M. M., McCabe, R.E., Bieling, P. J.(2011). Perfectionism in anxiety and depression; Comparisons across disorders, relations with symptom severity, and role of comorbidity.International Journal of Cognitive Therapy, 4(1), 66-91.

Segal Z, Bieling P. J., Young T, MacQueen G, Cooke R, Martin L, Bloch R, Levitan R. (2010) Antidepressant Monotherapy vs Sequential Pharmacotherapy and Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy, or Placebo, for Relapse Prophylaxis in Recurrent Depression. Archives of General Psychiatry, 67(12):1256-1264.

Christina Gojmerac, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Christina Gojmerac, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
Seniors Mental Health Program
Clinical Neuropsychology Service
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155 ext. 36299
Fax: 905-381-5610
Email: cgojmera@stjoes.ca

Dr. Gojmerac received her Ph.D in 2009 from the University of Toronto and completed her internship at Baycrest Hospital in Toronto, Ontario. She is currently a clinical neuropsychologist at St. Joseph’s Healthcare in the Seniors Mental Health Program, and is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. Dr. Gojmerac’s clinical and research interests are in aging, cognition, and mental health.

Selected Publications:

Wiegand, M.A., Troyer, A.K., Gojmerac, C., & Murphy, K.J. (2013) Facilitating change in health-related behaviors and intentions: a randomized controlled trial of a multidimensional memory program for older adults. Aging and Mental Health, 17(7), 806-815.

Ishii, R., Gojmerac, C., Stuss, D., Gallup, G.G.Jr, Alexander, M.P., Chau, W., & Christo,P. (2004). MEG Analysis of “Theory of Mind” in Emotional Vignettes Comprehension. Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, 28, 1-5.

Dixon, M.J., Desmarais, G., Gojmerac, C., Schweizer, T.A., & Bub, D. (2002). The role of premorbid expertise on object identification in a patient with category-specific visual agnosia. Cognitive Neuropsychology, 19(5), 401-419.

David A. Grant, Ph.D., C.Psych.

David A. Grant, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
Mood Disorders Program
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 39506
Email: dgrant@stjoes.ca 

Dr. Grant received his Ph.D. in 2012 from Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and completed his internship and post-doctoral fellowship in the Mood and Anxiety Program at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto, Ontario.  He is an Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. Dr. Grant's current clinical and research focus is on empirically-supported interventions in Mood and Anxiety Disorders, with specific emphasis on Cognitive-Behavioural and mindfulness-based approaches. He supervises psychology residents and practicum students at St. Joseph’s Healthcare in CBT for Mood and Anxiety Disorders, as well as in psychodiagnostic and other assessments. Dr. Grant is a member of the College of Psychologists of Ontario, the Canadian Psychological Association, and the Ontario Psychological Association.

Selected Publications:

Alloy, L. B., Bender, R. E., Whitehouse, W. G., Wagner, C. A., Liu, R. T., Grant, D. A., et al. (2012). High behavioral approach system (BAS) sensitivity and reward responsiveness predict first onset of bipolar spectrum disorders: A prospective behavioral high-risk design. Journal of Abnormal Psychology121, 339-351.

Bieling, P. J., & Grant, D. A. (2007). Toward bridging the science and practice of depression prevention: What can we learn from cognitive vulnerability?Canadian Psychology, 48, 240-255.

Cogswell, A., Alloy, L. B., Karpinski, A., & Grant, D. A. (2010). Assessing Dependency using Self-report and Indirect Measures: Examining the Significance of Discrepancies. Journal of Personality Assessment92, 306-316.

Grant, D. A., Bieling, P. J., Segal, Z. V., & Cochrane, M. M. (2013). Cognitive models and issues in depression. In M. Power (Ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell handbook of mood disorders (2nd ed.). Wiley-Blackwell.

Iacoviello, B. M., Grant, D. A., Alloy, L. B., & Abramson, L. Y. (2009). Cognitive personality characteristics impact the course of depression: A prospective test of sociotropy, autonomy and domain-specific life events. Cognitive Therapy and Research33, 187-198.

Stange, J. P., Shapero, B. G., Jager-Hyman, S., Grant, D. A., Abramson, L. Y., & Alloy, L. B. (2013). Behavioral approach system (BAS)-relevant cognitive styles in individuals with high vs. moderate BAS sensitivity: A behavioral high-risk design. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 37, 139-149.

Sheryl M. Green, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Sheryl M. Green, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Clinical and Health Psychologist
Women's Health Concerns Clinic &
Behavioural Sleep Medicine
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155 x 33672
Email: sgreen@stjoes.ca

Dr. Green received her M.A. from York University and her Ph.D. from the University of Regina (2006). She completed her pre-doctoral internship at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto, ON. She currently works as a psychologist within the Women's Health Concerns Clinic and the Consultation Liaison Service (within Behavioural Sleep Medicine) at St. Joseph's Healthcare. Dr. Green is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University and Associate Director of Clinical Training for the Research and Clinical Training Stream, Department of Psychology. Dr. Green’s clinical interests include cognitive behavioural and mindfulness-based interventions for depression, anxiety, and health-related difficulties. Research interests include women’s mental health across the reproductive timeline, developing cognitive-behavioural treatment protocols for specialized populations, and understanding treatment outcomes related to CBT for insomnia. Dr. Green actively supervises psychology post-docs and residents, psychiatry residents, psychology practicum students and CBS students within McMaster University. She has several publications in peer-reviewed journals, has presented at numerous national and international conferences, and has co-authored two books.

Selected Publications:

Green, S. M., Donegan, E., Agako, A., McCabe, R. E. Streiner, D., & Frey, B. N. (2020). Cognitive behavioral therapy for perinatal anxiety: A randomized controlled trial. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry.

Green, S. M., Donegan, E., McCabe, R. E., Fedorkow, D., Streiner, D., & Frey, B. N. (2020). Evaluating objective versus subjective outcomes in vasomotor symptoms following cognitive behavioural therapy. Climateric.

Green, S. M., Frey, B. N., Donegan, E., & McCabe, R. E. (2019). Cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety and depression during pregnancy and beyond: How to manage symptoms and maximizing well-being. (Routledge Publications: New York, NY)

Goldfinger, C., Green, S. M., Furtado, M., & McCabe, R. E. (2019). Examining worry content in a perinatal sample with generalized anxiety disorder. Journal of Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy.

Green, S. M., Donegan, E., Frey, B. N., Fedorkow, D., Streiner, D., Key, B., & McCabe, R. (2019). Cognitive behavioral therapy for menopausal symptoms (CBT-Meno): A randomized controlled trial. North American Menopause Society-NAMS.

Furtado, M., VanLieshout, R. J., VanAmerigan, M., Green, S. M., & Frey, B. N. (2019). Biological and psychosocial predicators of anxiety worsening in the postpartum period: A longitudinal study. Journal of Affective Disorders, 250, 218-225.

Green, S. M., Key, B. L., & McCabe, R. E. (2015). Cognitive behavioral, behavioral and mindfulness based therapy for menopausal depression: A review Maturitas, 80, 37-47.

Green, S. M., McCabe, R., & Soares, C. N. (November 2012). The cognitive behavioral workbook for menopause: A step by step program for overcoming hot flashes, mood swings, insomnia, depression, anxiety, and other symptoms. (New Harbinger Publications: Oakland, CA).

Brenda Key, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Brenda Key, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
Mood Disorders Program and
Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic
West 5th Campus

Tel:  905-522-1155, ext. 35375
Fax:  905-521-6120
E-mail: bkey@stjoes.ca

Dr. Key received her Ph.D. from the University of Calgary and completed her pre-doctoral residency training at Calgary Clinical Psychology Residency program.  She is a psychologist at the Mood Disorders Program and the Anxiety Treatment and Research Centre. She is currently completing a post-doctoral fellowship that involves both clinical and research components. Her clinical work is focused on the assessment and treatment of patients with co-morbid anxiety and mood disorders. Her research is focused on the development and evaluation of interventions that integrate cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and mindfulness based therapies (MBTs) for patients with anxiety and mood disorders. She is interested in mechanisms of change in CBT and MBTs such as changes in rumination, meta-cognition and emotion regulation. Dr. Key has published peer-reviewed journal articles and has made a number of presentations at scientific meetings.

Selected Publications:

Key, B. L., Rowa, K., Bieling, P., McCabe, R., & Pawluk, E. J. (2017). Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy as an augmentation treatment for obsessive–compulsive disorder. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, 112. DOI: 10.1002/cpp.2076

Squazzin, C., Key, B.L., Rowa, K., Bieling, P., McCabe, R. (2016). Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Residual Anxiety Symptoms in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: A Qualitative Analysis, Mindfulness, 8(1). DOI: 10.1007/s12671-016-0592-y

Samaan, Z., Litke, K., McCabe, K., Whattam, J., Garrick, L., O'Neill, L., Tabak, T., Simons, S., Chalmers, S., Key, B.L., Vanstone, M., Xie, F., Guyatt, G., & Thabane, L. (2015). A pragmatic pilot randomized trial to investigate the effectiveness of BehaviouRal ActiVation group therapy in reducing dEpressive symptoms and improving quality of life in patients with depression: The BRAVE pilot trial protocol, Pilot and Feasibility Studies. DOI: 10.1186/s40814-015-0034-y

Molls, S., Key, B.L., Frolic, A. (2015). Investing in compassion: Exploring Mindfulness as a strategy to enhance interpersonal relationships in healthcare practice. Journal of Hospital Administration, 4(6), 31-36. DOI: 10.5430/jha.v4n6p36

Green, S., Key, B.L., McCabe, R. (2015). Cognitive-behavioral, behavioral, and mindfulness-based therapies for menopausal depression: A review. Maturitas. 80(1), 37-47. DOI: 10.1016/j.

Jelena King, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Jelena King, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Associate Director of Training, Psychology Residency Program
Psychologist, Schizophrenia & Community Integration Service & Clinical Neuropsychology Service
West 5th Campus 

Tel: 905-522-1155 ext. 36299
Fax: 905-381-5610
E-mail: kingj@stjoes.ca

Dr. Jelena King received her Ph.D. in 2005 from the University of Waterloo, and completed a clinical internship at Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care and a postdoctoral fellowship in the Schizophrenia Program at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and Psychiatry Department, University of Toronto. Dr. King was employed as a psychologist in the Schizophrenia Program at the CAMH from 2006 to 2007 and then joined the Schizophrenia & Community Integration Service and Clinical Neuropsychology Service at St. Joseph’s Healthcare in a clinical research position that combines her primary interests of cognition in schizophrenia, neuropsychological and psychological assessment, psychotherapy and clinical training and teaching. Dr. King holds an academic appointment in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neuroscience at McMaster University. She is also the Associate Director of Training in the Psychology Residency Program at St. Joseph’s Healthcare, Hamilton.

Selected Publications:

Parlar, M.E., Spilka, M.J., Wong Gonzalez, D., Ballantyne, E.C., Dool, C., Gojmerac, C., King, J., HcNeely, H., & MacKillop, E. (in press). “You can’t touch this”: Delivery of inpatient neuropsychological assessment in the era of COVID-19 and beyond. The Clinical Neuropsychologist. https://doi.org/10.1080/13854046.2020.1810324

King, J. P., Ballantyne, E. & McNeely, H.E. (2020). Stress Awareness and Management in Medical Settings. In: Humanism and Resilience in Residency Training: A Guide to Physician Wellness​. In: A. Hategan, K. Saperson, S. Harms, H. Waters, Eds. Switzerland: Springer, pp.219- 245.

King, J. P., Ballantyne, E. & McNeely, H.E. (2020). Cognitive and Mindfulness Conceptualization. In: Humanism and Resilience in Residency training: A Guide to Physician Wellness​. Editors: A. Hategan, K. Saperson, S. Harms, H. Water. Eds. Switzerland: Springer. pp. 273-296.

Wilkins, L. K., Girard, T. A., Christensen, B. K., King, J., Kiang, M., & Bohbot, V. D. (2019). Spontaneous spatial navigation circuitry in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Psychiatry Research, 278, 125-128.doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2019.05.032 

McNeely, H.E. & King, J.P. (2019).  Neuropsychology and the Geriatric Inpatient. In: H. Fenn, A. Hategan, A. & J. A. Bourgeois, Eds. Inpatient Geriatric Psychiatry. Switzerland: Springer.

King, J.P., McNeely, H.E., & Ballantyne, E. (December 2018). Promoting healthier thinking to build resilience. RESPITE; https://respite.machealth.ca/

Gardizi, E., King, J.P., McNeely, H.E., & Vaz, S.M. (2018). Comparability of the WCST and WCST-64 in the assessment of first-episode psychosis. Psychological Assessment, 31(2), 271-276.http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pas0000670

King, J.P., Gojmerac, C.B., & McNeely, H.E. (2015). Psychological assessment of borderline personality disorder in geriatric patients. In: A Hategan, J.A. Borgeois, & G.L. Xiong (Eds.), Borderline Personality Disorder in Older Adults: Emphasis on Care in Institutional Settings. New York: Nova Science Publishers.

Wilkins, L.K., Girard, T.A., King, J.P., King, M., Herdman, K.A., Christensen, B.K., & King,J.(2013). Spatial-memory deficit in schizophrenia under viewpoint-independent demands in the virtual courtyard task.  Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 35(10):1082-93. doi: 10.1080/13803395.2013.857389. 

Christensen, B.K., Spencer, J. M. Y., King, J. P., Sekuler, A.B., & Bennett, P.J. (2013). Noise as a mechanism of anomalous face perception among persons with schizophrenia. Frontiers in Psychology, 13 (4) 507. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00507

Wilkins, L.K., Girard, T.A., Konishi, K., King, M., Herdman, K.A., King, J.P., Christensen, B.K., & Bohbot, V. D. (2013). Selective deficit in spatial memory strategies contrast to intact response strategies in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders tested in a virtual navigation task. Hippocampus. 23(11):1015-24. doi: 10.1002/hipo.22189.

King, J.P., Christensen, B.K., & Westwood, D.A. (2008).Grasping behavior in schizophrenia suggests selective impairment in the dorsal pathway. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 117(4), pp. 799-811.

Wilson, C.M., Christensen, B.K., King, J.P., Li, Q., & Zelazo, P.D. (2008). Decomposing perseverative errors among undergraduates scoring high on the schizotypal personality scale. Schizophrenia Research, 106, pp. 3-12.

 

Michele Laliberté, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Michele Laliberté, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist and Director
Eating Disorders Program
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 34093
Fax: 905-540-6574
E-mail: mlaliber@stjoes.ca

Dr. Laliberte is Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Neurosciences and Associate Member of the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. She is also the Lead of the outpatient adult Eating Disorders Program at St. Joseph’s Healthcare in Hamilton. She received her Ph.D. from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario where she established a CBT group-based treatment program for adolescents with eating disorders. Currently, she directs a CBT-based program for adults with eating disorders which offers both group-based CBT and individual CBT-e for transition-aged youth (ages 16-22). The program also offers specialized group treatment for binge eating disorder. Dr. Laliberte has trained numerous health care professionals in both individual and group CBT treatment for eating disorders. She is a member of the steering committee for the provincially funded eating disorder programs where she co-chairs the program evaluation special interest group. She has published on the role of weight control beliefs and on family factors that predict disturbed eating, and has presented at international conferences on eating disorders. She has published a book on weight management, The Cognitive Behavioral Workbook for Weight Management: A Step-by-Step Program, with colleagues Randi McCabe and Valerie Taylor. She has also developed treatment manuals for Binge Eating Disorder, Eating Disorders and Body Image that are used in programs across Ontario. She is currently researching factors associated with recovery and relapse in the treatment of disordered eating. In addition to her administrative, teaching and research activities, Dr. Laliberte also maintains a private practice in eating disorders.

Selected Publications:

Ghai, A., Milosevic, I., Laliberte, M., Taylor, V.H.,  McCabe, R.E. (2014). Body image concerns in obese women seeking bariatric surgery. Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, 7.2, 96-107.

Laliberte, M., Balk, Tweed, S., D., Smith, J. & Ghai, A. (2014). The impact of education on weight control beliefs. Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, 7.2, pp. 86 - 95

Laliberte, M., McCabe, R.E., & Taylor, V.H. (2009). The Cognitive Behavioral Workbook for Weight Management: A Step-by-Step Program. New Harbinger Publications.

Laliberte, M., Newton, M., McCabe, R., & Mills, J.S. (2007). Controlling your weight versus controlling your lifestyle: How beliefs about weight control affect risk for disordered eating, body dissatisfaction and self-esteem. Cognitive Therapy and Research., 31, 853-869.

Laliberte, M., Mills, J., Newton, M., & McCabe, R. (2004). Perceived control over weight versus perceived control over lifestyle: Their relationship to disturbed eating and self-esteem. (abstract) International Journal of Eating Disorders, 35(4), 450.

Miller, J.L, Schmidt, L.A., Vaillancourt, T., McDougall, P., & Laliberte, M. (2006). Neuroticism and introversion: A risky combination for disordered eating among a non-clinical sample of undergraduate women. Eating Behaviors, 7(1), 69 – 78.

Naish, K., Laliberte, M. MacKillop, J., & Balodis, I. (2018). Systematic review of the effects of acute stress in binge eating disorder. European Journal of Neuroscience, 50(3), 2415-2429.

Bruno Losier, Ph.D., C.Psych. , ABPP-CN

 Bruno Losier, Ph.D., C.Psych. , ABPP-CN

Psychologist
Forensic Program
West 5th Campus 

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 35592
Fax: 905-381-5610
E-mail: losierb@stjoes.ca  

Dr. Losier received his Ph.D. in 1999 from Dalhousie University, and completed his internship at Camp Hill Medical Centre in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He is currently a staff psychologist in the Forensic Psychiatry Program, West 5th campus, St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton hospital. As a Forensic Psychologist and Clinical Neuropsychologist, he is involved in many aspects of psychological service delivery including court ordered assessment (Not Criminally Responsible, Section 21/22, Fitness to Stand Trial, etc.), risk for recidivism assessment, and various psychological and neuropsychological treatment options. Dr. Losier is an associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. His recent teaching responsibilities include didactic seminars to both Psychology and Psychiatry residents, as well as supervision of undergraduate and graduate psychology research programs. Additionally, he regularly facilitates tutorials for undergraduate medical students. His recent clinical and research interests include an examination of rTMS technology in the management of sever mental illness, rTMS technology as a cognitive enhancement protocol, and psychological factors influencing jury decision making. A key research focus is Moral Injury in individuals found Not Criminally responsible. He sits on a number of departmental and program committees (e.g. chair of Psychiatry Grand Rounds committee, Therapeutic Program Coordination Committee), as well as being a frequent examiner for the College of Psychologist of Ontario. Lastly, he has published over a dozen peer reviewed journal articles and has given numerous presentations at professional conferences.

Selected Publications:

Roth, S, Qureshi, A., Moulden, H.M., Losier, B., McKinnon, M. Moral Injury in forensic psychiatry: A qualitative investigation into the moral-affective experiences of offenders with mental illness (Submitted)

Johnston, A, Losier, B, Ambrosini, D An investigation on the impact of the illusory truth effect on juror decision making process: Is it better to early or late when it comes to critical evidence? (Submitted)

Losier, B, Mamak, M, and Moulden. H (2017) Informed Consent for treatment in Forensic Psychiatry; Is it a realistic Proposition? Journal of Psychiatry and Psychiatric Disorders, 1(6) 308-312

Losier, B, & Hategan, A. (2017) Neuropsychological Assessment of Delirium in Older Adults. IN Delirium: Prevention, Symptoms and Treatment. J.A. Bourgeois, Editor, NOVA Science Publishers, New York

Prat, S., Losier, B., Moulden, H, and Chaimowitz, G. (2017) Incapacity of the mind secondary to the medication misuse as a not criminally responsible (NCR) defense. Journal of Forensic Sciences 62(1) 267-269

Bourgeois, J., Hategan, A, and Losier, B. (2014) Delirium in the Hospital Setting: Emphasis on Geriatric Patients. Current Psychiatry, 13(8) 36-43

McNair, S., Hategan, A., Bourgeois, J. and Losier, B. (2013) Neuropsychiatric symptoms in Scleroderma. Psychosomatics, 54(4) 382-386

Hategan, A., Parthasarathi, U., Losier, B., and Bourgeois, J. (2011) Farh-Type calcification and neuropsychiatric symptoms with M-Proteinemia. Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, 23(4) p.1

Emily MacKillop, Ph.D., C.Psych., ABPP-CN

Emily MacKillop, Ph.D., C.Psych., ABPP-CN

Psychologist
Clinical Neuropsychology Service
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 35592
Fax: 905-381-5610
E-mail: smckillo@stjoes.ca

Dr. MacKillop has been a member of the Clinical Neuropsychology Service at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton since 2014. She is also an Assistant Professor (PT) in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. She earned a B.A. from the University of Iowa and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Clinical Psychology at the State University of New York at Binghamton. She completed a clinical internship in both Clinical and Neuropsychology at the Medical University of South Carolina, followed by a two-year postdoctoral fellowship specializing in Neuropsychology at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center through Harvard Medical School. She has been board certified in Neuropsychology through the American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP) since 2012. Prior to joining SJHH, she had worked in both clinical and neuropsychology roles independent practice, as a faculty member in the department of psychology at the University of Georgia, and as a staff neuropsychologist for a major medical centre in Atlanta, Georgia. She is dedicated to promoting post-graduate training in Neuropsychology in Canada and is the current director of the Neuropsychology Postdoctoral Fellowship at SJHH. She also serves as an external member of the Canadian credentialing committee for the American Board of Clinical Neuropsychology (ABCN). She has an appreciation of a holistic approach to assessment, treatment, and intervention, which actively considers medical, neurological, psychological, and behavioural factors as collectively impacting the wellness of an individual. Her research focuses on this perspective in applied clinical contexts, particularly pertaining to acute inpatient psychiatry, medical and neurological illness, somatoform disorders, and symptom validity.

Selected Publications:

MacKillop, E. McCabe, R. (in press). Structuring and Delivering Group CBT in Heterogeneous Inpatient Settings. In Bieling, P., McCabe, R., & Antony, M. (Eds), Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Groups, Second Edition.

Mullally, K., McLachlan, K., Pei, J., MacKillop, E. (2020). Performance validity testing in justice-involved adults with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 1-13.

Gardizi, E., MacKillop, E, & Gaind, G. (2019). Self-Injurious Behaviour in a Patient with Dementia: A Case Report and Literature Review. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 207(1), 6-11.

MacKillop, E. & Chaimowitz, G. (2016). Correctional Settings. In Hategan, A., Bourgeois, J.A.,& Hirsch, C. H. (Eds), On-Call Geriatric Psychiatry, pp. 295-303. Springer International: Switzerland.

Mini Mamak, Ed.D., C.Psych.

Mini Mamak, Ed.D., C.Psych.

Senior Psychologist, Forensic Psychiatry Program
West 5th Campus
Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 36601
Fax: 905-575-6057
E-mail: mmamak@stjoes.ca

Dr. Mamak received her doctoral degree in 1997 from the OISE at the University of Toronto and completed her internship year at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (previously the Clarke Institute of Psychiatry) in Toronto. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences and the Senior Psychologist for the Forensic Psychiatry Program at St. Joseph’s Healthcare. Dr. Mamak is a co-developer of the electronic Hamilton Anatomy of Risk Management (eHARM) and the Aggressive Incidents Scale (AIS), two innovative methods of assessing and documenting risk. Dr. Mamak is also a member of the Ontario Review Board and is on the Board of Advisory for the Canadian Critical Incident Association. Dr. Mamak has significant experience working with offender populations and has worked with both provincial and federal corrections. In addition, she routinely consults with local and national police agencies, and is a frequent guest lecturer at the Canadian Police College. She has particular interests in the area of female offending, hostage negotiations, violent offending, and risk prediction.

Selected Publications: 

Moulden, H. M., Mamak, M., & Chaimowitz, G. (2020). A preliminary evaluation of the effectiveness of dialectical behaviour therapy in a forensic psychiatric setting. Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health.

Battaglia, A.M., & Mamak, M. (2020). Female Sexual Offending and Judicial Decision Making. Journal of Risk and Recovery. In press.

Battaglia, A.M., Gicas, K., Mamak, M., & Goldberg, J. (2020). Interpersonal Misperceptions among Aggressive Forensic Psychiatric Patients. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Cook, A. N., Moulden, H., M. Mamak, M., Lalani, S., Messina, K., & Chaimowitz, G. (2016). Validating the Hamilton Anatomy of Risk Management – Forensic Version and the Aggressive Incidents Scale. Assessment. Online First Jul 15, 2016. doi: 0.1177/1073191116653828

Randi E. McCabe, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Randi E. McCabe, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Director, Mental Health and Addictions Program
St. Joseph’s Healthcare
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 33695
Fax: 905-521-6120
E-mail: rmccabe@stjoes.ca

Dr. McCabe is a clinical psychologist and Director of Mood, Anxiety and Senior’s Mental Health Programs at St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton. She is also a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University where she is the Academic Head of the Anxiety Division and Co-Lead of the Department Mentoring Program. She is actively involved in training other mental health professionals and has given many workshops on conducting cognitive behavioural therapy and the treatment of anxiety disorders and related disorders. Dr. McCabe has over 150 published articles and book chapters focused primarily in the area of anxiety and cognitive behavior therapy. She has disseminated her work broadly through publication of several CBT workbooks for clinicians and consumers including The Overcoming Bulimia Workbook (2003),10 Simple Solutions to Panic (2004), Overcoming Your Animal and Insect Phobias (2005), A Cognitive Behavioral Approach to Weight Management (2009, The Cognitive Behavioral Workbook for Menopause (2012), and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety and Depression during Pregnancy and Beyond (2018). She also coauthored Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Groups (2006) and co-edited Phobias: The Psychology of Irrational Fear (2015). Her books have been translated into many languages including Chinese, Polish, Spanish, French, Italian, Dutch, Hebrew, and Japanese. Dr. McCabe is past president of the Canadian Association of Cognitive and Behavioural Therapies (CACBT) and was involved in developing national credentialing standards for CBT in Canada. Her current funded research is focused on the relationship between cannabis use and anxiety as well as the validation of the Diagnostic Assessment Research Tool (DART). In recognition of her contributions to the field, Dr. McCabe was elected Fellow status in the Canadian Psychological Association (2016), the Association of Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies (2017), and CACBT (2018).

Selected Publications:

Lenton-Brym, A.P., Rogojanski, J., Hood, H.K., Vorstenbosch, V., McCabe, R.E., & Antony, M.M. (2020). Development and validation of the Ryerson Social Anxiety Scales (RSAS). Anxiety, Stress, & Coping. https://doi.org/10.1080/10615806.2020.1771137

Green, S., Donegan, E., McCabe, R.E., Fedorkow, D., Streiner, D., & Frey, B. (2020). Objective and subjective vasomotor symptoms outcomes in the CBT-Meno randomized controlled trial. Climateric. DOI: 10.1080/13697137.2020.1737929

Bogie, B., Kapczinski, F., McCabe, R.E., McKinnon, M., & Frey, B. (2020). Emotional reactivity and explicit emotional memory biases in major depressive disorder during euthymia. Psychiatry Research. DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2020.112847

Oglesby, M.E., Gros, D.F., & McCabe, R.E. (2020). Intolerance of uncertainty and social anxiety while utilizing a hybrid approach to symptom assessment. International Journal of Cognitive Therapy. https://doi.org/10.1007/s41811-020-00068-5

Green, S., Donegan, E., McCabe, R.E., Streiner, D., Agako, A., & Frey, B. (2020). Cognitive behavioral therapy for perinatal anxiety: A randomized controlled trial Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry. DOI: 10.1177/0004867419898528

Amlung, M., Marsden, E., & McCabe, R.E. (2019). The elusive nature of delay discounting as a trans-diagnostic process in psychiatric disorders: The devil is in the detail – Reply. JAMA Psychiatry. DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2019.4124

Wen, A., LeMoult, J., McCabe, R.E., & Yoon, K.L. (2019). Generalized anxiety disorder and biases in affective flexibility. Anxiety, Stress, & Coping, 32, 581-593. DOI: 10.1080/10615806.2019.1638684

Goldfinger, C., Green S.M., Furtado, M., & McCabe, R.E., (2019). Characterizing the nature of worry in a sample of perinatal women with generalized anxiety disorder. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy. https://doi.org/10.1002/cpp.2413

Green, S., Donegan, E., Frey, B.N., Fedorkow, D.M., Key, B.L., Streiner, D.L., & McCabe, R.E. (2019). Cognitive behavior therapy for menopausal symptoms (CGT-Meno): A randomized controlled trial. Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause Society. DOI: 10.1097/GME.0000000000001363

Rowa, K., Cameron, D. Soreni, N., LeMoult, J., & McCabe, R.E. (2019). Outcome for CBT for problematic hoarding in a naturalistic setting: Impact on symptoms and distress tolerance. Behaviour Change, 1-9. DOI: 10.1017/bec.2019.17

LeMoult, J., McCabe, R.E., & Yoon, K.L. (2019). Cognitive control and cortisol response to stress in generalized anxiety disorder: A study of working memory capacity with negative and neutral distractors. Cognition and Emotion, 19, 1-7. DOI: 10.1080/02699931.2019.1666798

Amlung, M., Marsden, E., Holshausen, K., Morris, V., Patel, H., Vedelago, L., Naish, K., Reed, D.D., & McCabe, R.E. (2019). Delay discounting as a transdiagnostic process in psychiatric disorders: A meta-analysis. JAMA Psychiatry, 76, 1176-1186. DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2019.2102.

Ouellette, M.J., Puccinelli, C., Rowa, K., Elcock, A., & McCabe, R.E. (2019). Cannabis and Alcohol Use in Patients Seeking Therapy for Anxiety and Related Disorders: A Descriptive Study. Canadian Journal of Addiction, 10, 30-37.  DOI: 10.1097/CXA.0000000000000060 Cameron, D.H., Summerfeldt, L.J., Rowa, K., McKinnon, M.C., Rector, N.A., Richter, M.A.,

Ornstein, T.J., & McCabe, R.E. (2019). Differences in neuropsychological performance between incompleteness- and harm avoidance-related core dimensions in obsessive compulsive disorder. Journal of Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders, 22. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jocrd.2019.100448

McCabe, R.E., Rowa, K., Farrell, N.R., Young, L., Swinson, R.P., & Antony, M.M. (2019). Improving treatment outcome in obsessive-compulsive disorder: Does motivational interviewing boost efficacy? Journal of Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders, 22, 100446. DOI: 10.1016/j.cbpra.2009.06.009

Cameron, D.H., Streiner, D.L., Summerfeldt, L.J., Rowa, K., McKinnon, M.C., & McCabe, R.E. (2019). A comparison of cluster and factor analytic techniques for identifying symptom-based dimensions of obsessive-compulsive disorder. ​Psychiatry Research, 278, 86-96. DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2019.05.040.

Nowakowski, M., McCabe, R.E., & Busse, J. (2019). Cognitive-behavioural therapy to reduce persistent postsurgical pain following surgical fixation of extremity fractures: Rationale for a randomized controlled trial. Canadian Journal of Pain, 3, 59-68. https://doi.org/10.1080/24740527.2019.1615370

Soreni, N., Cameron, D.H., Streiner, D.L., Rowa, K., & McCabe, R.E. (2019). Seasonality patterns of internet searches on mental health in Ontario. JMIR Mental Health, 6, e12974. DOI: 10.2196/12974

Green, S.M., Frey, B.N., Donegan, E., & McCabe, R.E. (2018). Cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety and depression during pregnancy and beyond: How to manage symptoms and maximize well-being. New York, NY: Routledge.

McCabe, R.E., Milosevic, I., Rowa, K., Shnaider, P., Key, B., Pawluk, E., Antony, M.M. & the DART Working Group. (2017). Diagnostic Assessment Research Tool (DART). Hamilton, ON: St. Joseph’s Healthcare/McMaster University.

 

Margaret McKinnon, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Margaret McKinnon, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Homewood Chair in Mental Health and Addictions
Associate Professor and Associate Chair, Research
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioural Neurosciences
McMaster University
Research Lead
Mental Health and Addictions,
St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 35409
Email: mmckinno@stjoes.ca

Dr. McKinnon received her Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in 2003 and subsequently completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Centre. She is the Homewood Chair in Mental Health and Trauma and an Associate Professor and Associate Chair, Research in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. She also serves as the Mental Health and Addictions Research Lead at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton and as a Senior Scientist at Homewood Research Institute. Finally, Dr. McKinnon is the Director of Clinical Training for the Research and Clinical Training program stream in the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behavior at McMaster University. Work in Dr. McKinnon’s laboratory focuses on identifying the neural and behavioural correlates of PTSD and trauma-related illnesses and on translating this knowledge to the development and testing of novel treatment interventions aimed at reducing the cognitive and affective sequelae of these conditions. Dr. McKinnon has a special interest in military, veteran and first responder populations, and has worked with these groups clinically and in her research program. Her program of research is funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Worker’s Safety Insurance Board of Ontario, the Canadian Institute of Military and Veterans Health Research and Defence Canada.

Selected Publications:

McKinnon, M.C., Palombo, D., Nazarov, A., Kumar, N., Khuu, W., & Levine, B. (2015). Threat of death and autobiographical memory: A study of the passengers of Flight AT236. Clinical Psychological Science, 3(4), 487-502. doi:10.1177/2167702614542280.

Lanius, R., Frewen, P., Nazarov, A., & McKinnon, M.C. (2014). A social cognitive neuroscience approach to PTSD: Clinical & research perspectives. In Lanius, U. F., Paulsen, S.L. & Corrigan, F.M. (Eds). Neurobiology & Treatment of Traumatic Dissociation: Towards an Embodied Self. Springer: New York.

Parlar, M., Frewen, P., Nazarov, A., ­, C., MacQueen, G., & Lanius*, R., McKinnon*, M.C.   (2014). Altered empathic responding in women exposed to repeated developmental trauma. Brain and Behaviour. 13 MAR 2014, DOI: 10.1002/brb3.215.

Guo, Q., Parlar, M., Truong, W., Hall, G.B.C., Thabane, L.; McKinnon, M.C., Goeree, R., & Pullenayegum, E. (2014). The reporting of observational clinical functional magnetic resonance imaging studies: A systematic review. PLOS ONE. Apr 22;9(4):e94412. doi: 10.1371/ journal.pone.0094412. eCollection 2014.

Guo, Q., Thabane, L., Hall, G.B.C., McKinnon, M.C., Goeree, R., & Pullenayegum, E. (2014). A systematic review of the reporting of sample size calculations and corresponding data components in observational functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. NeuroImage, 86, 172-181.

Nazarov, A., Frewen, P., Parlar, M., Oremus, C., MacQueen, G., & McKinnon*, M.C., Lanius*, R. (2014). Theory of mind performance in women with posttraumatic stress disorder related to childhood abuse. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 129, 193-201.

King, M.J., MacDougall, A., Ferris, S., Herdman, K., Bielak, T., Smith, J., Abid, M.A., McKinnon, M.C. (2013). Impaired episodic memory for events encoded during manic but not depressed or euthymic mood states in bipolar disorder. Psychiatry Research, 205, 213-219.

McKinnon, M.C., Cusi, A., & MacQueen, G. (2013). Psychological factors that may confer risk for bipolar disorder. Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, 18(1-2), 115-128.

Cusi, A., Nazarov, A., MacQueen, G.M., & McKinnon, M.C. (2013) Theory of mind deficits in patients with mild symptoms of major depressive disorder. Psychiatry Research, 210, 672-674.

Meusel, L.A., Hall, G., Fougere, P., McKinnon, M.C., & MacQueen, G.M. (2013). Neural correlates of cognitive remediation in patients with mood disorders. Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, 214, 142-52.

Heather E. McNeely, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Heather E. McNeely, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Clinical Lead
Clinical Neuropsychology Service
Academic Lead
Schizophrenia & Community Integration Service
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 36422
Fax: 905-381-5610
E-mail: hmcneely@stjoes.ca  

Dr. McNeely received her Ph.D. in 1999 from the University of Waterloo, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship in the ERP Laboratory at the Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Centre and in the Neuropsychology Laboratory at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto. She started her career as a clinician-scientist in the Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program at CAMH. Since joining the faculty at St. Joseph's Healthcare and McMaster University in 2005, she has held a number of educational leadership roles. She is currently an Associate Professor, Director of Interprofessional Faculty Development and Academic Lead, Schizophrenia Division, in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences and holds adjunct faculty appointments in the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour and the McMaster Neuroscience graduate program. Her clinical and research interests focus on the interplay between neurobiological, affective and cognitive processes in functional outcome in persons with schizophrenia and severe mental illness.

Selected Publications:

Milanovic, M., McNeely, H.E., Qureshi, A., McKinnon, M. & Holshausen, K. (In Press). Evidence-based treatments for depression: Effects on neurocognition and adaptations for neurocognitive impairments. In S. McClintock and J. Choi (Eds.), Neuropsychological assessment and treatments for depression. New York, NY: Guilford Press. Guilford Press.

McNeely, H.E. & King, J.P. (2019). Neuropsychology and the Geriatric Inpatient. In: Fenn, H., Hategan, A. & Bourgeois, Eds. Inpatient Geriatric Psychiatry.Springer

McNeely, H.E. & King, J.P. (2018). Neuropsychology in Late Life. In: Hategan, A., Bourgeois, J.A., Hirsch, C. & Giroux, C. Eds., Geriatric Psychiatry: A Case-Based Textbook. 2018, Springer.

Gardizi, E., King, J.P., McNeely, H.E., & Vaz, S.M. (2018). Comparability of the WCST and WCST-64 in the assessment of first-episode psychosis. Psychological Assessment, doi: 10.1037/pas0000670

Pyrke RJ, McKinnon MC, McNeely HE, Ahern C, Langstaff KL & Bieling PJ (2017). Evidence-Based Design Features Improve Sleep Quality Among Psychiatric Inpatients. Health Environments Research & Design Journal, Article first published online: January 1, 2017    DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/1937586716684758

McInerney, S.J., McNeely, H.E., Geraci, J. Giacobbe, P. Rizvi, S.J., Ceniti, A.K., Cyriac, A., Mayberg, H.S., Lozano, A.M. & Kennedy, S.H. (2017). Neurocognitive Predictors of Response in Treatment Resistant Depression to Subcallosal Cingulate Gyrus Deep Brain Stimulation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience Vol 11, Article 74

Ahern, C., McKinnon, M.C., Bieling, P.J., McNeely, H.E., & Langstaff, K. (2016). Overcoming the challenges inherent in conducting design research in mental health settings: Lessons from St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton’s pre and post occupancy evaluation. Health Environments Research & Design Journal, 9(2), 119-129.

Oremus, C., Oremus, M., McNeely, H.E., Losier, B., Parlar, M., Hasey, G., Hall, G.B.C., King, M. The ECT & Cognition Systematic Review Team, Lanius, R. & McKinnon, M. (2015). Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy on Cognitive Functioning in Patients with Depression: Protocol for a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis, British Medical Journal, BMJ Open 2015;5: e006966. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006966

Nazarov, A., McNeely, H.E., Kiang, M., Lanius, R. & McKinnon, M. (2015). "Role of morality in the experience of guilt and shame within the armed forces". Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 1-16.

King, J.P., Gojmerac, C. & McNeely, H.E. (2015). Psychological Assessment of Borderline Personality Disorder in Geriatric Patients. In: Hategan, A., Bourgeois, J.A. & Xiong, G.L. Eds., Borderline Personality Disorder in Older Adults: Emphasis on Care in Institutional Settings. 2015, Nova.     

Zhu, N., Moulden, H.M., McNeely, H.E. & Mamak, M. (2013). The Role of Inattention in the Relationship between Mental Illness and Crime. The Journal of Forensic Psychology Practice, 13, 28-39.

McNeely, H.E., Lau, M.A., Christensen, B.K. & Alain, C. (2008). Neurophysiological evidence of cognitive inhibition anomalies in persons with major depressive disorder. Clinical Neurophysiology, 119, 1578-1589.

McNeely, H.E., Mayberg, H.S., Lozano, A.M. & Kennedy, S.H. (2008). Neuropsychological impact of Cg25 deep brain stimulation for treatment-resistant depression: preliminary results over 12 months. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. 196(5):405-10.

Rybak, Y., McNeely, H.E., Mackenzie, B., Jain U. & Levitan, R.D. (2007). Seasonality and circadian preference in adult ADHD: Clinical and neuropsychological correlates. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 48, 562-571.

Meyer, J.H., McNeely, H.E., Sagrati, S., Boovariwala, A., Martin, K., Verhoeff, N.P.L.G., Wilson, A.A., & Houle, S. (2006). Elevated putamen D2 receptor binding potential In major depression with motor retardation: An [11C] raclopride positron emission tomography study. American Journal of Psychiatry, 163, 1594-1602.

Mayberg, H., Lozano, A.M., Voon, V., Kennedy, S.K., McNeely, H.E., Hamani, C., Schwalb, J.M., Seminowicz, D. (2005). Deep brain stimulation for treatment-resistant depression. Neuron, 45, 1-10.

Irena Milosevic, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Irena Milosevic, Ph.D., C.Psych.

 

Psychologist
Anxiety Treatment & Research Clinic
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 32969
E-Mail: imilosev@stjoes.ca

Dr. Milosevic received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Concordia University and completed her pre-doctoral residency at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton (SJHH). She is currently a psychologist at the Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic at SJHH, where her role involves clinical service, research, and teaching. She also holds an appointment as Assistant Professor (PT) in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. Dr. Milosevic’s clinical interests include assessment and cognitive behavioural treatment (CBT) of anxiety and related disorders. Her research investigates treatment outcomes and mechanisms in CBT for anxiety and related disorders and comorbid anxiety, mood, and substance use disorders. Dr. Milosevic has authored a number of peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters, and she has presented her research at numerous national and international conferences.

Selected Publications:

Waechter, S., Rowa, K., Milosevic, I., Shnaider, P., Antony, M. M., & McCabe, R. E. (2017). Social anxiety and the accuracy of memory for childhood teasing frequency. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, 31, 151-157.

Milosevic, I., Chudzik, S. M., Boyd, S., & McCabe, R. E. (2017). Evaluation of an integrated group cognitive-behavioral treatment for comorbid mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders: A pilot study. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 46, 85-100.

Milosevic, I., Levy, H. C., Alcolado, G. M., & Radomsky, A. S. (2015). The Treatment Acceptability/Adherence Scale: Moving beyond the assessment of treatment effectiveness. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, 44, 456-469.

Milosevic, I., & McCabe, R. E. (Eds.) (2015). Phobias: The psychology of irrational fear. Santa Barbara, CA: Greenwood.

Milosevic, I., & McCabe, R. E. (2015). Agoraphobia. In R. Cautin & S. Lilienfeld (Eds.), The encyclopedia of clinical psychology. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.

Rowa, K., Gifford, S., McCabe, R. E., Milosevic, I., Antony, M. M., & Purdon, C. (2014). Treatment fears in anxiety disorders: Development and validation of the Treatment Ambivalence Questionnaire. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 70, 979-993.

Rowa, K., Milosevic, I., & Antony, M. M. (2014). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder: Applying the approach. In J. Weeks (Ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell handbook of social anxiety disorder. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.

Milosevic, I., & Radomsky, A.S. (2013). Incorporating the judicious use of safety behaviour into exposure-based treatments for anxiety disorders: A study of treatment acceptability. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, 27, 155-174.

Milosevic, I., & Radomsky, A.S. (2013). Keep your eye on the target: Safety behavior promotes lower levels of targeted maladaptive beliefs following a behavioral experiment. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 37, 557-571.

Heather M. Moulden, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Heather M. Moulden, Ph.D., C.Psych.

 

Psychologist
Forensic Program
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155 ext. 35539
Fax: 905-575-6057
E-mail: hmoulden@stjoes.ca

Dr. Moulden received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Ottawa, and her residency at St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton. She is a clinical forensic psychologist in the Forensic Program at St. Joseph's Healthcare, an Associate Clinical Professor with the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, and Associate Member in the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour at McMaster University. Her research and clinical interests include problematic sexual behaviour, enhancing forensic rehabilitation, and diagnostic issues relevant to risk and treatment.

Selected Publications:

Moulden, H. M., Mamak, M., & Chaimowitz, G. (2020). A preliminary evaluation of the effectiveness of Dialectical Behaviour Therapy in a forensic psychiatric setting. Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health. doi.org/10.1002/cbm.2158

Chaimowitz, G. A., Mamak, M., Moulden, H. M., Furimsky, I., & Olagunju, A. T. (2020). Implementation of risk assessment tools in psychiatric services. Journal of Healthcare Risk Management. doi.org/10.1002/jhrm.21405

Bouchard, K., Moulden H. M., & Lalumiere, M. (2019). Assessing paraphilic interests Among women who sexually offend. Current Psychiatry Review. doi.org/10.1007/s11920-019-1112-2

Bertsch, I., Cochez, F., Moulden, H. M., Prat, S., Lambert, H., Lassagne, G., Lamballais, C.,Defache, L., Pelletier, M., & Courtois, R. (2019). Comparaison franco-canadienne du développement des Cercles de soutien et de responsabilité (CSR) pour la prévention du risque de récidive des délinquants sexuels. International Journal of Risk and Recovery. doi.org/10.15173/ijrr.v2i2.3901 Vedelago,L., Amlung, M., Morris, V., Petker, T., Balodis, I., McLachlan, K., Mamak, M.,

Moulden,H. M., Chaimowitz, G., & MacKillop, J. (2019). Technological Advances in the Assessment of Impulse Control in Offenders: A Systematic Review. Behavioral Sciences & the Law. doi.org/10.1002/bsl.2420

Joseph Pellizzari, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Joseph Pellizzari, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry Service
Bishop Tonnos Palliative Care Program
Charlton Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155 ext. 34258
Email: jpellizz@stjoes.ca

Dr. Pellizzari received his Ph.D. in 2000 from the University of Western Ontario, following the completion of his internship at Victoria Hospital (London Health Sciences Centre). Prior to joining the faculty at St. Joseph's Healthcare in 2008, he was employed with the Mental Health Care Program at London Health Sciences Centre for over 10 years, working in the areas of consultation-liaison psychiatry and behavioural medicine. His practice involves the assessment and treatment of patients with complex medical and psychiatric presentations. He has developed clinical liaisons with a variety of medical services including respirology, palliative care, critical care, and renal transplant. Of particular interest has been the delivery of psychological services (e.g., consultation, brief intervention) in the acute care medical/surgical setting. Dr. Pellizzari is CACBT-ACTCC Certified in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. He has also been active in education; teaching aspects of psychosomatic medicine to undergraduate medical students, supervising psychology and psychiatry residents, and participating in various educational initiatives with other medical specialties. Research interests include aspects of ICU (Intensive Care Unit) recovery. He is an Associate Professor (part-time) with the McMaster Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences.

Selected Publications:

Pellizzari JR. (2019). Clinical Psychology: Interprofessional Promise & Perspectives. Panel on Interprofessional Education. Annual Innovations in Palliative Care Event organized by the McMaster Division of Palliative Care (Family Medicine), Hamilton, Canada.

Pellizzari, J. (2017). Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy Approaches to Managing challenges in Respiratory Disease. Better Breathing 2017. Ontario Respiratory Care Society, Toronto, Canada.

Pellizzari J, Kho M, Rudkowski J. (2016). Surviving and Thriving After Critical Illness. McMaster University Demystifying Medicine Seminar Series, Hamilton, Canada.

Baba-Willison K, Pellizzari JR, Woods A, Shadd J, Swinton M, Farag A, O'Donnell C, Frolic A. (2019). A simple survey . . . not so simple a response: Caring for those who suffer in this era of Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD). Paper presented at the Canadian Bioethics Society Conference., Banff, Canada Kho ME, Molloy AJ, Clarke FJ, Reid JC, Herridge MS, Karachi T, Rochwerg B,

Fox-Robichaud AE, Seely AJE, Mathur S, Lo V, Burns KEA, Ball IM, Pellizzari JR, Tarride JE, Rudkowski J, Koo KY, Heels-Ansdell D, Cook DJ, and the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group. (2019). Multicentre pilot randomised clinical trial of early in-bed cycle ergometry with ventilated patients.BMJ Open Resp Res.;6:e000383.6.

Tulloch TG, Fillmore D, Pellizzari JR, McCabe RE. (2019). Introducing a novel approach to dialysis modality education. Presentation at the Canadian Association of Nephrology Nurses and Technologists., Edmonton, Canada. Hamilton Scleroderma Group and Scleroderma Society of Ontario, Hamilton, Canada.

Karen Rowa, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Karen Rowa, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Director of Training, Psychology Residency Program
Psychologist, Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 33656
Fax: 905-521-6120
E-mail: krowa@stjoes.ca 

Dr. Rowa received her Ph.D. in 2003 from the University of Waterloo, and she completed her internship training at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto, Ontario. She is a psychologist at the Anxiety Treatment and Research Centre and an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. She is also the Director of Training in the Psychology Residency Program at St. Joseph’s. Her research is focused on evaluating cognitive behavioural models and treatments of the anxiety disorders, with a specific focus on obsessive compulsive disorder and social anxiety disorder. She also studies problematic hoarding.

Selected Publications:

Cameron, D., Summerfeldt, L.J., Rowa, K., McKinnon, M.C., Rector, N.A., Ornstein, T.J., Richter, M.A., & McCabe, R.E. (in press). Differences in neuropsychological performance between incompleteness- and harm avoidance-related core   dimensions in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders.

Cameron, D.H., Rowa, K., McKinnon, M.C., Rector, N.A., & McCabe, R.E. (in press). Neuropsychological performance across symptom dimensions in obsessive-compulsive disorder: A comment on the state and critical review of the literature. Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics.

Auyeung, K., Hawley, L.L., Grimm, K., McCabe, R.E., & Rowa, K. (2020). Fear of negative evaluation and rapid response to treatment during cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 1-12.

Rowa, K., Cameron, D., Soreni, N., LeMoult, J., & McCabe, R.E. (2019). Outcome of CBT for problematic hoarding in a naturalistic setting: Impact on symptoms and distress tolerance. Behaviour Change, 1-9

Ouellette, M.J., Puccinelli, C., Rowa, K., Elcock, A., & McCabe, R.E. (2019). Cannabis and alcohol use in patients seeking therapy for anxiety and related disorders: A descriptive study. Canadian Journal of Addiction, 19, 1-9.

McCabe, R.E., Rowa, K., Young, L., Swinson, R.P., Farrell, N., & Antony, M.M. (2019). Improving treatment outcome in obsessive compulsive disorder: Does a motivational enhancement intervention boost efficacy? Journal of Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders, 22, 10046.

Hood, H.K., Wilson, G.A., Koerner, N., McCabe, R.E., Rowa, K., & Antony, M.M. (2019). Poor insight in obsessive-compulsive disorder: Examining the role of cognitive and metacognitive variables. Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders, 23, 100447.

Peter Sheridan, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Peter Sheridan, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
Forensic Psychiatry Program
West 5th Campus

Telephone:  905-522-1155 ext. 39319
Fax:  905-381-5605
Email:  psherida@stjoes.ca

Peter Sheridan received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from York University. Dr. Sheridan has published and presented in the areas of sexual and gender identity, antigay violence, sexual and relationship violence, and professional boundary transgressions. He has provided clinical services for both the provincial and federal ministries of corrections and, most recently, was the Chief Psychologist at Grand Valley Institution for Women, the largest federal women’s prison in Canada. In addition to his role as psychologist in the Forensic Outpatient Program at St. Joe’s, he maintains a private practice in Hamilton and Toronto with a focus on assessment for criminal and civil proceedings, treatment for offenders returned to the community on parole or probation, and intervention for professionals, including physicians, lawyers, and teachers, facing censure or discipline by their regulatory bodies. Dr. Sheridan’s current research interests include evaluating the efficacy of substance abuse and CBTp interventions for forensic populations.

Selected Publications:

Sheridan, P. (2020, March 10). Psychological assessment of Dangerous Offenders. Seminar presented at University of Toronto. Toronto, Ontario.

Grimes, K. M. & Sheridan, P. (2019). The implementation of cognitive behavioural therapy for psychosis (CBTp) in a forensic setting: Lessons learned and future directions. International Journal of Risk and Recovery, 2, 18-22.

Sheridan, P. (2019, August 22). Mindfulness for clinician self-care. The Forensic Psychiatry Institute 2019. Muskoka, Ontario.  

Sheridan, P., & Grimes, K. (2019, April 12). Implementation of CBTp for forensic patients. 13th Annual Risk & Recovery Forensic Conference. Hamilton, Ontario.

Prat, S., Sheridan, P., Fraser, C., & McLean, A. (2019, April 11). And you thought you’d heard everything... What’s new in forensic sexology? 13th Annual Risk & Recovery Forensic Conference. Hamilton, Ontario.

Sheridan, P. (2018, July 24). Recognizing and managing transference and countertransference in forensic practice. The Forensic Psychiatry Institute 2018. Muskoka, Ontario.

Sheridan, P., Solow, M. L., & Oliveira-Picado, C. (2018, April 13). Weed matters: Managing risk of forensic outpatients in chillin’ times. 12th Annual Risk & Recovery Forensic Conference. Hamilton, Ontario.

Sheridan, P. (2017, May 26). Mandated treatment: Clinical and ethical quicksand? Grand Rounds, North York General Hospital. Toronto, Ontario.

Stacey Tweed, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Stacey Tweed, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
Eating Disorders Program
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155 ext. 34263
E-Mail: stweed@stjoes.ca

Dr. Tweed received a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from York University in Toronto, ON and completed her pre-doctoral residency training at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton (SJHH). Dr. Tweed’s research interests include examining factors relevant to the treatment of eating disorders (e.g., emotion regulation, motivation, self efficacy beliefs), as well as the prevention of disordered eating behaviours more generally. Dr. Tweed has co-authored a number of peer-reviewedjournal articles and has presented her work at numerous international conferences.

Selected Publications:

Davis, C., Patte, K., Levitan, R., Reid, C., & Tweed, S. (2007). From motivation to behaviour: A model of reward sensitivity, overeating, and food preferences in the risk profile for obesity. Appetite, 48(1), 12-19.

Davis, C., Patte, K., Tweed, S., & Curtis, C. (2007). Personality traits associated with decision-making deficits. Personality and Individual Differences, 42(2), 279-290.

Ferrari, M., Tweed, S., Rummens, J. A., Skinner, H., & McVey, G. (2009). Health materials and strategies for the prevention of immigrants’ weight-related problems. Qualitative Health Research, 19(9), 1259-1272.

Kirsh, G., McVey, G., Tweed, S., & Katzman, D. K. (2007). Psychosocial profiles of young adolescent females seeking treatment for an eating disorder. Journal of Adolescent Health, 40(4), 351-356.

Laliberte, M. M., Balk, D., Tweed, S., Smith, J. & Ghai, A. (2014). The impact of education on weight control beliefs. Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, 7(2), 86-95.

McVey, G., Davis, R., Tweed, S., & Shaw, B. F. (2004). Evaluation of a school-based program designed to improve body image satisfaction, global self-esteem, and eating attitudes and behaviors: A replication study. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 36(1), 1-11.

McVey, G., Gusella, J., Tweed, S., & Ferrari, M. (2009). A controlled evaluation of web-based training for teachers and public health practitioners on the prevention of eating disorders. Eating Disorders: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention, 17(1), 1-26.

McVey, G., Tweed, S., & Blackmore, E. (2007). Health Schools-Healthy Kids: A controlled evaluation of a comprehensive universal eating disorder prevention program. Body Image, 4(2), 115-136.

McVey, G., Tweed, S., & Blackmore, E. (2005). Correlates of weight loss and muscle gaining behavior in 10- to 14- year old males and females. Preventive Medicine: An International Journal Devoted to Practice and Theory, 40(1), 1-9.

McVey, G., Tweed, S., & Blackmore, E. (2004). Dieting among preadolescent and young female adolescents. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 170(10), 1559-1561.

Tweed, S. R. (2013). Group-based emotion focused therapy (EFT) for women with binge spectrum eating disorders in an outpatient setting: A preliminary comparison. Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering, 75(7-B).

 

Colleen Merrifield, Ph.D., C. Psych.

Colleen Merrifield, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist                                                            
WSIB Specialty Clinic – Mental Health Program
St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton - West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155 x39615
Fax: 905-381-5639
E-Mail: cmerrifi@stjoes.ca

Dr. Merrifield received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Waterloo, where she held a Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship. She completed her predoctoral residency at the University of Ottawa and the Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre. Dr. Merrifield recently joined the WSIB Specialty Clinic. Dr. Merrifield was previously a psychologist in the Mood Disorders Program after completing a postdoctoral fellowship at SJHH in both the Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic and the Mood Disorders Program. In her current role as a psychologist in the WSIB Specialty Clinic, her work focuses on integrating clinical practice, research, and teaching. She also holds a part-time appointment as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. Clinically, Dr. Merrifield’s interest lies in the assessment and cognitive behavioural treatment of mood, anxiety, and related disorders and she is a founding member of the Canadian Association of Cognitive and Behavioural Therapies. Her research focuses on the development, evaluation, and dissemination of transdiagnostic CBT treatments for mood and anxiety disorders. Dr. Merrifield has published a number of peer-reviewed manuscripts and book chapters and has made numerous presentations both in the Hamilton community and at national and international professional conferences.

Selected Publications:

Danckert, J., & Merrifield, C. (in press). Boredom, sustained attention and the default mode network. Experimental Brain Research.

Merrifield, C., & McCabe, R.E. Specific phobia. In Amy E. Wenzel (Ed.), The SAGE encyclopedia of abnormal and clinical psychology (in press).

Merrifield, C., & McCabe, R.E. Cognitive behavioral group therapy. In Amy E. Wenzel (Ed.), The SAGE encyclopedia of abnormal and clinical psychology (in press).

Merrifield, C., & McCabe, R.E. Alcohol-induced anxiety disorder. In Amy E. Wenzel (Ed.), The SAGE encyclopedia of abnormal and clinical psychology (in press).

Merrifield, C., & Danckert, J. Characterizing the psychophysiological signature of boredom (2014). Experimental Brain Research, 232, 481-491. doi: 10.1007/s00221-013-3755-2

Merrifield, C., Balk, D., & Moscovitch, D. A. (2013). Self-portrayal concerns mediate the relationship between recalled teasing and social anxiety in adults with anxiety disorders. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 27, 456-460. doi: 10.1016/j.janxdis.2013.05.007

Malkovsky, E., Merrifield, C., Goldberg, Y. K., & Danckert, J. (2012). Exploring the relationship between boredom and sustained attention. Experimental Brain Research, 222, 57-69. doi: 10.1007/s00221-012-3147-z

Moscovitch, D. A., Gavric, D. L., Merrifield, C., Bielak, T., & Moscovitch, M. (2011). Retrieval properties of negative versus positive mental images and autobiographical memories in social anxiety: Outcomes with a new measure. Behavior Research and Therapy, 49, 505-517. doi: 10.1016/j.brat.2011.05.009

Merrifield, C., Hurwitz, M., & Danckert, J. (2010). Multimodal temporal perception deficits in a patient with left spatial neglect. Cognitive Neuroscience, 1, 244-253. doi: 10.1080/17588921003759934

Elena Ballantyne, Psy.D., C.Psych.

Elena Ballantyne, Psy.D., C.Psych.

Dr. E. Ballantyne

Psychologist
Clinical Neuropsychology Service
West 5th Campus
Tel: 905-522-1155 ext. 39366
E-mail: eballant@stjoes.ca 

Dr. Ballantyne obtained a B.A. with Honours in Psychology from Queen’s University in 2004. She completed a Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology with a specialization in Clinical Neuropsychology at the Adler School of Professional Psychology in Chicago, Illinois. She completed her residency at St. Joseph’s Healthcare in Hamilton, Ontario and completed her supervised practice and post-doctoral fellowship jointly at St. Joseph’s Healthcare and Bieman-Copland and Associates in St. Catharines, Ontario. She has worked as a licensed Clinical Neuropsychologist since 2014 and her area of practice is with adults and seniors with an emphasis on traumatic brain injury. Her areas of interest include neuropsychological assessment, psychotherapy after brain injury, and cognitive rehabilitation in addition to clinical training and teaching. Dr. Ballantyne’s treatment approach is client-centered and integrates cognitive-behavioural therapy and acceptance and commitment therapy. Her research focuses on cognitive remediation and psychotherapy for individuals with cognitive impairment.

Selected Publications:

Cummings, J.A., Ballantyne, E.C., & Scallion, L. (2015). Essential processes for clinical supervision: Agenda setting, problem-solving, and formative feedback. Psychotherapy, 52(2):158-163.

Cummings, J.A. & Ballantyne, E.C. (2014). What does bad supervision look like? The      Behavior Therapist, 37(8):230-235.

Burns, A.S., Delparte, J.J., Ballantyne, E.C., & Boschen, K.A. (2013). Evaluation of an interdisciplinary program for chronic pain following spinal cord injury. Pain Management & Rehabilitation, 5(10):832-832.

Elmar Gardizi, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Elmar Gardizi, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
Cleghorn Early Intervention Clinic
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155 Ext. 33883
Fax: 905-525-2805
Email: egardizi@stjoes.ca 

Dr. Gardizi received his Ph.D. from the University of Windsor in 2015 and completed his internship and postdoctoral training at St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University with primary rotations in the Clinical Neuropsychology Service, Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic, and the Cleghorn Early Intervention Clinic.  Dr. Gardizi is currently employed as a psychologist at the Cleghorn Early Intervention Clinic where he provides neuropsychological assessment and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to individuals with first episode psychosis. His research interests primarily focus on the assessment cognitive functioning and outcome in first episode psychosis and traumatic brain injury.

Selected Publications:

Gardizi, E., King, J.P., McNeely, H.E., & McDermid Vaz, S. (2019). Comparability of the WCST and WCST-64 in the assessment of first episode psychosis. Psychological Assessment, 31(2), 271-276.

Gardizi, E., MacKillop, E., & Gaind, G. (2019). Self-injurious behaviour in a patient with dementia: A case report and literature review. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 207(1), 6-11.

Gardizi, E., Czepita, A., Cole, E., Weatherston, B., Cooper, B., & Archie, S. (2017, May). Examining the predictors and sustainability of recovery for a 5-year early intervention program for psychoses: A research proposal. Poster presented at the Early Psychosis Intervention Ontario Network (EPION), Mississauga, Ontario.

Gardizi, E., Wikkerink, S., & King, J. (2017, May). Specifying cut-off scores and identifying factors influencing validity testing in first episode psychosis using the Reliable Digit Span. Poster presented at the 29th Annual Research Day, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario.

Gardizi, E., Hanks, R., Millis, S. R., & Figueroa, M. (2014). Comorbidity and insurance as predictors of disability following traumatic brain injury. Archives of Physical  Medicine and Rehabilitation, 95(12), 2396-2401. 

Gardizi, E., Millis, S. R., Hanks, R., & Axelrod, B. (2012). Analysis of the Postconcussive Syndrome Questionnaire: Measuring the core construct of brain injury symptomatology. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 26(6), 869-878.  

 

Matilda Nowakowski, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Matilda Nowakowski, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
Bariatric Clinic
West 5th Campus

E-mail: mnowakow@stjoes.ca  

Dr. Nowakowski received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Ryerson University in 2014 and her Ph.D., in experimental psychology from McMaster University in 2009.  She completed her pre-doctoral residency at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton (SJHH) as well as a postdoctoral fellowship at the Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic at SJHH and the Digestive Diseases Clinic at McMaster University Medical Centre.  She is currently working as a Psychologist in the Bariatric Clinic at SJHH and is an Assistant Clinical Professor (PT) in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University.  She previously worked as a psychologist in the Chronic Pain Clinic at SJHH. Dr. Nowakowski's clinical interests include cognitive-behavior therapy and acceptance-based interventions for patients dealing with chronic medical conditions. Dr. Nowakowski’s research focuses on examining the predictors and mediators of treatment outcome in patients with chronic medical conditions well as evaluating the integration of psychological treatments, especially cognitive-behaviour therapy, into medical settings. 

Selected Publications:

Nowakowski, M.E., McCabe, R.E., & Busse, J.W. (2019). Cognitive-behavioral therapy to reduce persistent postsurgical pain following internal fixation of extremity factures (COPE): Rationale for a randomized controlled trial. Canadian Journal of Pain, 3, 59-68.

Nowakowski, M.E., & McCabe, R.A. (2017). Panic disorder: Treatment. In A.E. Wenzel (Ed.), The SAGE encyclopedia of abnormal and clinical psychology. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

Nowakowski, M.E., Rowa, K. Antony, M.M., & McCabe, R.E. (2016). Changes in anxiety sensitivity following group cognitive-behaviour therapy for social anxiety disorder and panic disorder. Cognitive Therapy and Research.

Nowakowski, M.E., McCabe, R., Rowa, K., Surette, M., Moayyedi, P., & Anglin, R. (2016). The gut microbiome: Potential implications for the understanding and treatment of psychopathology. Canadian Psychology, 57, 67-75.

Nowakowski, M.E., Antony, M.M., & Koerner, N. (2015). Modifying interpretation biases: Effects on symptomatology, behavior, and physiological reactivity in social anxiety. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 49, 44-52.

Caitlin Davey, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Caitlin Davey, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
Mood Disorders Program
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 35542
Email: cdavey@stjoes.ca

Dr. Caitlin Davey received her Ph.D. from the Ryerson University in 2015 and completed her internship at St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University with primary rotations in the Mood Disorders Service, Eating Disorders Clinic and Health Psychology. Dr. Davey is currently employed as a psychologist at the Mood Disorders Service where she completes psychological assessments for diagnostic clarification as well as cognitive-behavioural group therapy. She also completes tasks related to program evaluation within the Mood Disorders Service. Her research interests primarily focus on program evaluation as well as the development, implementation and evaluation of culturally safe assessment and psychotherapeutic processes for Indigenous populations in Canada.

Selected publications:

Rouse, J., McShane, K. E., Usher, A., & Davey, C. J. (in press). Debriefing and research participation. In A. Wenzel (Ed.), The SAGE encyclopedia of abnormal and clinical psychology. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc.

Baskin, C., & Davey, C. J. (2015). Parallel pathways to decolonization: Critical and Indigenous social work. In S. Wehbi & H. Parada (Eds), Re-imagining anti-oppression: Reflecting on practice. Waterloo, ON: Wilfred Laurier University Press.

Key, B., & Davey, C. J. (2015). Interoceptive exposures. In I. Milosevic & R. E. McCabe (Eds.), Phobias: The psychology of irrational fear, an encyclopedia. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO.

Key, B., & Davey, C. J. (2015). Relaxation. In I. Milosevic & R. E. McCabe (Eds.), Phobias: The psychology of irrational fear, an encyclopedia. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO.

Davey, C. J., Landy, M., Pecora, A., Quintero, D., & McShane, K. (2015). A realist review of brief interventions for alcohol misuse delivered in emergency departments. Journal of Systematic Reviews, 45, DOI: 10.1186/s13643-015-0024-4.

McShane, K., Davey, C. J., Rouse, J., Usher, A., & Sullivan, S. (2015). Beyond ethical obligation to research dissemination and utilization: Conceptualizing debriefing as a form of knowledge translation. Canadian Psychology, 56(1), 80-87.

Baskin, C., & Davey, C. J. (2014). Grannies, Elders and friends: Aging Indigenous women in Toronto. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 58(1), 46-65, DOI: 10.1080/01634372.2014.912997.

Davey, C. J., Niccols, A., Henderson, J., Dell, C., Wylie, T., Suave, E, Dobbins, M., & Sword, (2014). Predictors of research use among service providers targeting Aboriginal women with addictions. Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse, 13, 315-336. DOI: 0.1080/15332640.2014.938211.

Stephanie Waechter, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Stephanie Waechter, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
WSIB Speciality Clinic – Mental Health Program
St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton - West 5th Campus
Tel: 905-522-1155 x 36381
Fax: 905-381-5639
Email: swaechte@stjoes.ca

Dr. Waechter received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Waterloo. She completed her predoctoral residency at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton (SJHH), and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at SJJH’s Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic. In her current role as a psychologist with the WSIB Specialty Clinic – Mental Health Program, Dr. Waechter focuses on integrating clinical practice, teaching and supervision, and research. She holds a part-time appointment as an Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. Clinically, Dr. Waechter’s work focuses on providing comprehensive assessments and evidence-based treatment for individuals who have sustained a workplace psychological injury. Her main clinical interests involve trauma and stressor related disorders, anxiety and related disorders, mood disorders, and emotion dysregulation. Dr. Waechter’s research interests include cognitive processes in the development, maintenance and treatment of anxiety and related disorders, as well as program evaluation and assessing treatment outcomes. Dr. Waechter has published a number of peer-reviewed manuscripts and book chapters and has made numerous presentations both in the Hamilton community and at professional conferences.

Selected Publications:

Bielak, T., Moscovitch, D. A., & Waechter, S. (2018). Out of my league: Appraisals of anxiety and confidence in others by individuals with and without social anxiety disorder. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 57, 76-83.

Waechter, S., Moscovitch, D. A., Vidovic, V., Bielak, T., Rowa, K., & McCabe, R. E. (2018). Working memory capacity in social anxiety disorder: Revisiting prior conclusions. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 127, 276-281.

Waechter, S., Rowa, K., Milosevic, I., Shnaider, P., Antony, M.M., McCabe, R.E. (2017). Social anxiety and the accuracy of memory for childhood teasing frequency. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, 31, 151-157.

Moscovitch, D.A., Waechter, S., Bielak, T., Rowa, K., & McCabe, R.E. (2015). Out of the shadows and into the spotlight: Social blunders fuel fear of self-exposure in social anxiety disorder. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 34, 24-32.

Moscovitch, D.A., Shaughnessy, K., Waechter, S., Xu, M, Collaton, J., Nelson, A. L., Barber, K. C, Dean, J., Chiang, B., & Purdon, C. (2015). A model for recruiting clinical research participants with anxiety disorders in the absence of service provision: Visions, challenges, and norms in a Canadian context. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 203, 943-957.

Waechter, S. & Stolz, J.A. (2015). Trait anxiety, state anxiety, and attentional bias to threat: Assessing the psychometric properties of response time measures. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 39, 441-458.

Waechter, S., Nelson, A. L., Wright, C., Hyatt, A. & Oakman, J. (2014). Measuring attentional bias to threat: The reliability of dot probe and eye movement indices. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 38, 313-333.

Katherine Holshausen, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Katherine Holshausen, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist, Borderline Personality Disorder Service
Clinical Lead & Research Director, Community Psychiatry Clinic
Assistant Professor, McMaster University
West 5th Campus
Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 33965
Fax: 905-521-6059
E-mail: kholshau@stjoes.ca

Dr. Holshausen received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the Queen’s University, where she held a Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship. She completed her predoctoral residency at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton in the Borderline Personality Disorder Service, Mood Disorders Program, and Schizophrenia Outpatient Clinic. In her current role as a psychologist in the Borderline Personality Disorder Clinic, her work focuses on integrating clinical practice in a DBT-informed framework with teaching and program evaluation. In her role as Research Director of the Community Psychiatry Clinic, Dr. Holshausen is involved in overseeing research projects taking place across the following services: Concurrent Disorders, Bridge to Recovery, General Psychiatry, and the Borderline Personality Disorder Service. The majority of ongoing research involves program evaluation and monitoring treatment outcomes. She also holds a part-time appointment as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. Dr. Holshausen’s clinical and research interests lie in the role of trauma in maintaining severe psychopathology and identifying factors that thwart functional recovery. Dr. Holshausen has authored a number of peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters, and she has presented her research at numerous national and international conferences.

Selected Publications:

Morris, V., Goodgame Huffman, L., Naish, K., Holshausen, K., Oshri, A., McKinnon, M., & Amlung, M. (2020). Impulsivity as a mediating factor in the association between post-traumatic stress symptoms and substance use. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, & Policy.

Amlung, M., Marsden, E., Holshausen, K., Morris, V., Patel, H., Vedelago, L., Naish, K.R., Reed, D.D., McCabe, R.E. (2019). Delay discounting as a transdiagnostic process in psychiatric disorders: A meta-analysis. JAMA psychiatry, 76(11), 1176-1186.

Milanovic, M., Holshausen, K., & Bowie, C.R. (2018). Functional competence in major depressive disorder: Objective performance and subjective perceptions. Journal of Affective Disorders, 234, 1-7.

Milanovic, M., Eyukawa, E., Usyatynsky, S., Holshausen, K., & Bowie, C.R. (2018). Self-efficacy in depression: Bridging the gap between competence and real-world functioning. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 5, 350-355.

Bowie, C.R., Grossman, M.J., Gupta, M., Holshausen, K., & Best, M.W. (2017). Action-based cognitive remediation for individuals with serious mental illnesses: Effects of real-world simulations and goal setting on functional and vocational outcomes. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, advance online publication.

Holshausen, K., Bowie, C.R., & Harkness, K.L. (2016). The relation of childhood maltreatment to psychotic symptoms in adolescents and young adults with major depressive disorder. Journal of Child and Adolescent Clinical Psychology, 45, 241-247.

Gupta, M., Holshausen, K., Gou, L., & Bowie, C.R. (2014). Measuring negative symptom change in schizophrenia: Considering alternatives to self-report. Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics, 14, 911-922.

Holshausen, K., Bowie, C.R. Mausbach, B., Patterson, T.L., & Harvey, P.D. (2014). Neurocognition, functional capacity, and functional outcomes: The cost of inexperience. Schizophrenia Research, 152, 430-434.

Gupta, M., Holshausen, K., Best, M.W., Jokic, R., Milev, R., Bernard, T., Gou, L., & Bowie, C.R. (2013). Relationships among neurocognition, symptoms, and functioning in treatment-resistant depression. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 8, 272-281.

Holshausen, K., Harvey, P.D., Elvevag, B., Foltz, P., & Bowie, C.R. (2013). Latent semantic variables associated with formal thought disorder and social-adaptive behaviour in older inpatients with schizophrenia. Cortex, 55, 88-96.

Elizabeth Pawluk, Ph.D., C.Psych

Elizabeth Pawluk, Ph.D., C.Psych

Psychologist
Anxiety Treatment & Research Clinic
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 39874
E-Mail: epawluk@stjoes.ca

Dr. Pawluk is a Psychologist at the Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic (ATRC) at St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton. She received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Ryerson University followed by a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Clinical Psychology at the ATRC. She is actively engaged in clinical work, research, and clinical supervision. Her primary research focus is generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), with a specific interest in testing theoretical models of GAD. Dr. Pawluk is also the Director of the Clinical Behavioural Sciences Program at McMaster University and an Associate Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences.

Selected Publications:

Pawluk, E. J., Koerner, N., Kuo, J. R., & Antony, M. M. (2018). An experience sampling study of emotion and worry in generalized anxiety disorder. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Pawluk, E. J., Koerner, N., Tallon, K., & Antony, M. M. (2017). Unique correlates of problem-solving effectiveness in individuals with generalized anxiety disorder. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 41, 881-890.

Key, B. L., Rowa, K., Bieling, P., McCabe, R., & Pawluk, E. J. (2017). Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy as an augmentation treatment for obsessive compulsive disorder. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy. Advanced online publication.

Pawluk, E. J. & Koerner, N. (2016). The relationship between negative urgency and generalized anxiety disorder symptoms: The role of intolerance of negative emotions and intolerance of uncertainty. Anxiety, Stress, & Coping, 29, 606-615.

MacDonald, E. M, Pawluk, E. J., Koerner, N., & Goodwill, A. M. (2015). An examination of distress tolerance in undergraduate students high in symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, 44, 74-84.

Pawluk, E. J., & Koerner, N. (2013). A preliminary investigation of impulsivity in generalized anxiety disorder. Personality and Individual Differences, 54, 732-737.

Taylor Hatchard, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Taylor Hatchard, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
Youth Wellness Centre
Assistant Professor, McMaster University
Tel: 905-522-1155 ext: 35542
Fax: 905-527-8291
E-mail: thachar@stjoes.ca 

Dr. Hatchard received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at the University of Ottawa in 2018. He completed his predoctoral residency at the University of Ottawa’s Centre for Psychological Services and Research (CPSR), where he provided assessment and treatment services to youth and adults across a wide range of mental health concerns. During his year of supervised practice, Dr. Hatchard worked as a staff psychologist in the Mood Disorders Program and the Youth Wellness Centre at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton. His current role involves providing assessment and treatment services, research, program development and evaluation, and clinical supervision. In terms of his research interests, Dr. Hatchard is interested in the application of neuroimaging techniques to clinical research and is particularly interested in understanding the role of emotion dysregulation in the development of future psychopathology among youth. He also has a specific interest in increasing understanding, access to services, and development of evidence-based treatments for the LGBTQ2S+ community.

Selected Publications:

Mioduoszewski, O., Hatchard, T., Fang, Z., Khoo, E.L., Small, R., Tennant, E.M., Romanow, H., Shergill, Y., Schneider, M.A., *Browne, N.., Poulin, P., & Smith, A.M. (2020). Breast Cancer Survivors Living with Chronic Neuropathic Pain Show Improved Brain Health Following Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction: A Preliminary Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study. Journal of Cancer Survivorship. DOI: doi.org/10.1007/s11764-020-00903-w.

Phillips, J.L., Norris, S., Talbot, J., Birmingham, M., Hatchard, T., Ortiz, A., Owoeve, O., Batten, L. & Blier, P. (2020). Single, repeated, and maintenance ketamine infusions for treatment-resistant depression: a randomized controlled trial. Reprinted in FOCUS, 18, 236-243. DOI: doi.org/10.1176/appi.focus.18206

Hatchard, T., Byron-Alhassan, A., Mioduszewski, O., Holshausen, K., *Correia, S., Leeming, A., Ayson, G., *Chiasson, C., Fried, P., Cameron, I., & Smith, A. (2020). Working overtime: Altered functional connectivity in working memory following regular cannabis use in young adults. International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction. DOI: doi.org/10.1007/s11469-020-00226-y.

Phillips, J.L., Norris, S., Talbot, J., Hatchard, T., Ortiz, A., Birmingham, M., Owoeve, O., Batten, L. & Blier, P. (2020). Single and Repeated Ketamine Infusions for Reduction of Suicidal Ideation in Treatment-Resistant Depression. Neuropsychopharmacology, 45, 606-612. DOI: doi:10.1038/s41386-019-0570-x.

Phillips, J.L., Norris, S., Talbot, J., Birmingham, M., Hatchard, T., Ortiz, A., Owoeve, O., Batten, L. & Blier, P. (2019). Single, repeated, and maintenance ketamine infusions for treatment-resistant depression: a randomized controlled trial. American Journal of Psychiatry, 176, 401-409. DOI: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18070834.

Khoo, E-L., Small, R., Cheng, W., Hatchard, T., Glynn, B., Skidmore, B., Hutton, B., & Poulin, P. (2019). Comparative evaluation of a group-based Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for the treatment and management of chronic pain: A systematic review and network meta-analysis. Evidence-Based Mental Health, 22, 26-35. DOI: 10.1136/ebmental-2018-300062.

Hatchard, T., Mioduszewski, O., Fall, C., Byron-Alhassan, A., Fried, P., & Smith, A.M. (2017). Neural impact of low-level alcohol use on response inhibition: an fMRI investigation in young adults. Behavioural Brain Research, 349, 12-19. DOI: 10.1016/j.bbr.2017.04.032.

Hatchard, T., Mioduszewski, O., Zambrana, A., O’Farrell, E., Caluyong, M., Poulin, P.A. & Smith, A.M. (2017). Neural changes associated with mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR): Current knowledge, limitations, and future directions. Psychology and Neuroscience, 10, 41-56. DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1037/pne0000073.

Smith, A.M., Mioduszewski, O., Hatchard, T., Byron-Alhassan, A., Fall, C., & Fried, P. (2016). Prenatal marijuana exposure impacts executive functioning into young adulthood: an fMRI study. Neurotoxicology and Teratology, doi:10.1016/j.ntt.2016.05.010.

Poulin, P. A., Romanow, H. C., Rahbari, N., Small, R, Smyth, C. E., Hatchard, T., Solomon B. K., Song, X., Harris, C. A., Kowal, J., Nathan H. J., & Wilson, K. (2016). The relationship between mindfulness, pain intensity, pain catastrophizing, depression and quality of life among cancer survivors living with chronic neuropathic pain. Supportive Care in Cancer, 24, 4167-4175. DOI: 10.1007/s00520-016-3243-x.

Hatchard, T., Smith, A.M., Halchuk, R.E., Longo, C., Fried, P.A., Hogan, M.J., & Cameron, I. (2015). Effects of low-level alcohol use on cognitive interference: An fMRI study in young adults. Alcohol, 49, 7-13. DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2014.07.020.

Hannah McCabe-Bennett, Ph.D., C. Psych.

Hannah McCabe-Bennett, Ph.D., C. Psych.                      

Psychologist                                                            
WSIB Speciality Clinic – Mental Health Program
St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton - West 5th Campus             
Tel: 905-522-1155 x 35363
Fax: 905-381-5639
Email: hmccabe@stjoes.ca  

Dr. McCabe-Bennett received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Ryerson University. She completed her predoctoral residency at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton (SJHH). In her current role as a psychologist with the WSIB Specialty Clinic – Mental Health Program, Dr. McCabe-Bennett provides psychological assessment and treatment to injured workers. She also provides clinical supervision. She holds a part-time appointment as an Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. Clinically, Dr. McCabe-Bennett is primarily interested in anxiety and related disorders. Dr. McCabe-Bennett’s research interests include perfectionism and hoarding. Dr. McCabe-Bennett has published a number of peer-reviewed manuscripts and book chapters and has made numerous presentations both in the Hamilton community and at national and international conferences.

Selected Publications:

McCabe-Bennett, H., Lachman, R., Girard, T. A., & Antony, M. M. (2020). A virtual reality study of the relationships between hoarding, clutter, and claustrophobia. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 23, 83-89. doi:10.1089/cyber.2019.0320

McCabe-Bennett, H., Fracalanza, K., & Antony, M. M. (2018). The psychological treatment of generalized anxiety disorder. In D. David, S. Lynn, & G. Montgomery (Eds.), Evidence-based psychotherapy: The state of the science and practice. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.

Lima, J., McCabe-Bennett, H., & Antony, M. M. (2017). Treatment of storm fears using virtual reality and progressive muscle relaxation. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 46, 251-256. doi:10.1017/S1352465817000674

McCabe-Bennett, H., & Antony, M. M. (2015). Phobias, diagnosis of. In R. McCabe & I. Milosevic (Eds.), Phobias – the psychology of irrational fear: An encyclopedia. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-Clio.

 

Adjunct Supervisors

Martin M. Antony, PhD, CPsych, FRSC

Martin M. Antony, PhD, CPsych, FRSC

Consulting Psychologist
Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic
St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton
West 5th Campus

Tel: 416-979-5000, ext. 2631
E-Mail: mantony@psych.ryerson.ca
Personal Website: http://martinantony.com  

Dr. Antony is Professor in the Department of Psychology at Ryerson University in Toronto. He was also the founding director of both the Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic and the Psychology Residency Program at St. Joseph’s Healthcare, Hamilton.  Dr. Antony is a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and served as president of the Canadian Psychological Association (2009-2010). In 2018, he will begin a term as president-elect of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. Dr. Antony has published 30 books and over 250 scientific articles and book chapters in areas related to cognitive behavior therapy and anxiety-related disorders. He has given more than 425 presentations to audiences across four continents. He has also been interviewed, featured, or quoted more than 450 times in various print, radio, television, and online media outlets, including the CBC, CNN, CTV, the Globe and Mail, National Post, Toronto Star, New York Times, Washington Post, Scientific American Mind, and many others.

Recent Publications:

Button, M.L., Westra, H.A., Norouzian, N., Constantino, M.J., & Antony, M.M. (in press). Client reflections on confirmation and disconfirmation of expectations in cognitive behavioral therapy for generalized anxiety disorder with and without motivational interviewing. Psychotherapy Research.

Constantino, M.J., Romano, F.M., Coyne, A.E., Westra, H.A., & Antony, M.M. (in press). Client interpersonal impacts as mediators of long-term outcome in cognitive-behavioral therapy integrated with motivational interviewing for generalized anxiety disorder. Psychotherapy Research.

Constantino, M.J., Westra, H.A., Antony, M.M., & Coyne, A.E. (in press). Specific and common processes as mediators of the long-term effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy integrated with motivational interviewing for generalized anxiety disorder. Psychotherapy Research.

Coyne, A.E., Constantino, M.J., Laws, H.B., Westra, H.A., & Antony, M.M. (in press). Patient-therapist convergence in alliance ratings as a predictor of outcome in psychotherapy for generalized anxiety disorder. Psychotherapy Research.

Coyne, A.E., Constantino, M.J., Westra, H.A., & Antony, M.M. (in press). Competing indirect effects in a comparative trial for generalized anxiety disorder. Psychotherapy.

Krause, K.L., Stewart, K.E., Cassin, S.E., & Antony, M.M. (in press). Clinical perfectionism, dissatisfaction with standards, and raising the bar: Validation of the Response to Goal Achievement Scale. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy.

Ovanessian, M.M., Fairbrother, N., Vorstenbosch, V., McCabe, R.E., Rowa, K., & Antony, M.M. (in press). Psychometric properties and clinical utility of the Specific Phobia Questionnaire in an anxiety disorders sample. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment.

Poulin, L.E., Button, M.L., Westra, H.A., Constantino, M.J., & Antony, M.M. (in press). The predictive capacity of self-reported motivation vs. early observed motivational language in cognitive-behavioural therapy for generalized anxiety disorder. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy.

Hara, K.M., Westra, H.A., Constantino, M.J., & Antony, M.M. (2018). The impact of resistance on empathy in cognitive-behavioral therapy for generalized anxiety disorder. Psychotherapy Research, 28, 606-615.

Krause, K.L., MacDonald, E.M., Goodwill, A., Vorstenbosch, V., & Antony, M.M. (2018). Assessing safety behaviors in fear of storms: Validation of the Storm-Related Safety Behavior Scale. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 40, 139-148.

Lima, J., McCabe-Bennett, H., & Antony, M.M. (2018). Treatment of storm fears using virtual reality and progressive muscle relaxation. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 46, 251-256.

Wilson, G.A., Koerner, N., & Antony, M.M. (2018). An examination of feedback seeking in individuals with social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, or no history of mental disorder using a daily diary method. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, 32, 15-37.

Gary Chaimowitz, M.D., FRCP(C)

Gary Chaimowitz, M.D., FRCP(C)

Head of Service, Forensic Psychiatry Service,
St. Joseph’s Healthcare
Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University

Forensic Psychiatry Service
Centre for Mountain Health Services
St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton
100 West 5th St.
P.O. Box 585
Hamilton, Ontario L8N 3K7
Canada
Tel:  905-522-1155, ext. 36886
E-Mail: chaimow@mcmaster.ca

Dr. Chaimowitz is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University in Hamilton. He is the Head of Service, Forensic Psychiatry at St. Joseph’s Healthcare. In addition to subspecialty psychiatry certification, he has an MBA from the University of Toronto. He has a longstanding interest in First Nations mental health and acts as a consultant psychiatrist to the James Bay Cree communities of Northern Ontario. His continuing medical education activities include organizing the McMaster Muskoka Seminars, now in its 9th year.  He is a member of both the Ontario Review Board and the Consent and Capacity Board. He is secretary both to the Canadian Academy of Psychiatry and the Law as well as the Canadian Psychiatric Association Native Mental Health Section. He is a member of the Canadian Psychiatric Association Professional Standards and Practice Council.  

Catherine Dool, M.A.

Catherine Dool, M.A.

Psychometrist, Clinical Neuropsychology Service
St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton
100 West 5th Street
Hamilton, ON L9H 1G9
Canada
Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 36254

E-Mail: cdool@stjoes.ca

Catherine Dool received her M.A. in Clinical Neuropsychology from the University of Windsor (1992). She currently works as a psychometrist in Clinical Neuropsychology Services at St. Joseph’s. She has over twenty years clinical experience working with adolescents and adults with acquired brain injuries.  

Gary Hasey, M.D., FRCP(C)

Gary Hasey, M.D., FRCP(C)

Mood Disorders Program
Centre for Mountain Health Services
St. Joseph's Hospital
100 West 5th St.
P.O. Box 585
Hamilton, Ontario L8N 3K7
Canada
Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 35419
Fax: 905-381-5616
E-Mail: haseyg@mcmaster.ca

Dr. Hasey is a psychiatrist in the Mood Disorders Program at St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University.  He is involved in clinical research projects examining cognitive changes during the course of electroconvulsive therapy treatment (ECT).

Selected Publications:

Hasey, G.M., repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation , in Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs. Bezchlibnyk-Butler K.Z.. and Jeffries JJ, Eds. 18th revision Hofgrefe & Huber, US, Canada, Switzerland, Germany. 2008.

Hasey, G.M., repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation , in Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs. Bezchlibnyk-Butler K.Z.. and Jeffries JJ, Eds. 17th revision Hofgrefe & Huber, US, Canada, Switzerland, Germany. 2007.

Hasey, G.M., repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation , in Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs. Bezchlibnyk-Butler K.Z.. and Jeffries JJ, Eds. 16th revision Hofgrefe & Huber, US, Canada, Switzerland, Germany. 2006.

Hasey, G.M., Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation , in Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs. Bezchlibnyk-Butler K.Z.. and Jeffries JJ, Eds. 15th revision Hofgrefe & Huber, US, Canada, Switzerland, Germany. 2005.

Milev R, Abraham G, Hasey G, Cabaj JL Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Treatment of Medication-Resistant Depression in Older Adults: A Case Series. J ECT. 2008 Jul 23.

MacQueen G. Parkin C. Marriott M. Begin H. Hasey G. The long-term impact of treatment with electroconvulsive therapy on discrete memory systems in patients with bipolar disorder. Journal of Psychiatry & Neuroscience. 2007 Jul, 32(4):241-9.

Fregni F, Marcolin MA , Myczkowski M, Amiaz R, Hasey G, Rumi DO, Rosa M, Rigonatti SP, Camprodon J, Walpoth M, Heaslip M, Grunhaus, L, Hausmann L, Pascual-Leone A. Predictors of antidepressant response in clinical trials of transcranial magnetic stimulation. International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 2006 Dec;9(6):641-54. 

Jennifer Hewitt, Ph.D., C. Psych.

Jennifer Hewitt, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 35382
Fax: 905-521-6120
Email: jhewitt@stjoes.ca

Dr. Hewitt earned a B.Sc. from Western University, and received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 2014 from Lakehead University. She went on to complete her pre-doctoral residency training at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton. She is currently working as a psychologist at the Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton, and holds a part-time appointment as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. Dr. Hewitt’s clinical work is focused on the assessment and cognitive behavioural treatment of patients with anxiety and related disorders. Research interests include the development, evaluation, and dissemination of transdiagnostic behaviour therapy in the adolescent population, and developmentally adapted Cognitive Processing Therapy. Dr. Hewitt actively supervises psychology residents, psychiatry residents, psychology practicum students, and CBS students within McMaster University.

Selected Publications:

Gros, D., Merrifield, C., Hewitt, J., Elcock, A., Rowa, K., McCabe, R. (In Press) Preliminary Findings for Group Transdiagnostic Behavior Therapy (TBT) for the Affective Disorders in a Youth Sample. The American Journal of Psychotherapy.

 

Post-Doctoral Fellows in Psychology

Anita Hibbert
Seamus O'Byrne
Luke Schneider
Daniela Wong Gonzalez

 

2020/2021 Residents

Cara Dunkley  
University of British Columbia

Jean-Philippe Gagne
Concordia University

Pauline Leung
Queen's University

Melissa Milanovic
Queen's University

Danielle Rice
McGill University

Nena Wang
Simon Fraser University

Christiane Whitehouse
Dalhousie University

2019/2020 Residents

Alina Protopopescu               
McMaster University                          

Aliza Friedman                       
Ryerson University                

Dylan Gatner             
Simon Fraser University

Kathryn Miller                         
University of Waterloo

Kyrsten Grimes                     
University of Toronto             

Melissa Parlar                       
York University                                 

Molly McCarthy                     
York University                                  

Nadia Al-Dajani                      
University of Toronto                         

Teresa Marin                         
York University

2018/2019 Residents

Joanna Bhaskaran
University of Manitoba

Katrina Bouchard
Queen's University

Jenna Boyd
McMaster University

Rachelle Pullmer
Simon Fraser University

Jesse Renaud
Concordia University

Michael Spilka
University of Calgary

2017/2018 Residents

Anita Hibbert                         
University of British Columbia

Hanna McCabe-Bennett        
Ryerson University                            

Katherine Jongsma               
University of Windsor

Lauren David             
Ryerson University

Mengran Xu
University of Waterloo           

Michael Grossman    
Queen’s University                            

Tyler Tulloch              
Ryerson University

2016/2017 Residents

Karen Auyeung
University of British Columbia

Karen Zhang
Western University

Katherine Holshausen
Queen's University

Rose Robbins
University of Ottawa

Linette Savage
University of Calgary

Meredith Landy
Ryerson University