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SJHH ... / Mental Health & Addiction Services/ Mental Health Services/ Psychology Training/ Psychology Residency Program/ Faculty and Supervisors

Faculty and Supervisors

Core Faculty includes registered psychologists who provide supervision on major rotations. A subset of the core faculty sit on the Residency Program Training Committee, and all are involved in teaching didactic seminars.

Adjunct Faculty include psychologists who are less directly involved in resident supervision or who are currently working under supervised practice as well as other individuals from a variety of disciplines. They are involved in teaching didactic seminars to psychology residents and in some cases, provide clinical and research supervision.

Core Faculty

All
Peter J. Bieling, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Peter J. Bieling, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Director-Mood and Anxiety Services, Geriatric Services,
and Quality and Evaluation (Mental Health and Addictions)
West 5th Campus

Tel:  905-522-1155, ext. 36403
Fax:  905-521-6120
E-mail:  pbieling@stjoes.ca

Dr. Bieling received his Ph.D. in 1997 from the University of British Columbia, and completed his internship at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), in Toronto and a post-doctoral fellowship under Aaron T. Beck at the University of Pennsylvania in 1998. He is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences and the Director, Mood & Anxiety Services and Geriatric Services at St. Joseph's Healthcare. Dr. Bieling's research and clinical focus is on empirically supported interventions in Mood Disorders and Cognitive Behavioural treatments. He also leads the Quality and Evaluation Service Team (QUEST) a joint venture of the Mental Health and Addiction Program at St. Joseph's Healthcare and the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University. QUEST attempts to bring carefully designed research methodologies to questions related to program effectiveness and real world clinical dilemmas. Data generated from these efforts then assists the program in establishing priorities and making modifications to service delivery. Dr. Bieling is coordinator for CBT depression training in the psychiatry residency program and a Founding Fellow in the Academy of Cognitive Therapy.

Selected Publications:

Bieling, P. J., Hawley, L. L., Bloch, R. T., Corcoran, K. M., Levitan, R. D., Young, L. T., MacQueen, G. M., & Segal, Z. V. (In Press).  Treatment-Specific Changes in Decentering Following Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy Versus Antidepressant Medication or Placebo for Prevention of Depressive Relapse.Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology

Green, S. M., Bieling, P. J. (2012). Expanding the scope of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy: Evidence for effectiveness in a heterogeneous psychiatric sample. Cognitive Behavioral Practice, 19, 174-180.

Bieling, P. J. (2011). Is it medication versus mindfulness in prevention of depression relapse? Neuropsychiatry, 1, 97-99.

Wheeler, H.A., Blankstein, K. R., Antony, M. M., McCabe, R.E., Bieling, P. J.(2011). Perfectionism in anxiety and depression; Comparisons across disorders, relations with symptom severity, and role of comorbidity.International Journal of Cognitive Therapy, 4(1), 66-91.

Segal Z, Bieling P. J., Young T, MacQueen G, Cooke R, Martin L, Bloch R, Levitan R. (2010) Antidepressant Monotherapy vs Sequential Pharmacotherapy and Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy, or Placebo, for Relapse Prophylaxis in Recurrent Depression. Archives of General Psychiatry, 67(12):1256-1264.

Lisa A. Burckell, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Lisa A. Burckell, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
Borderline Personality Disorder Clinic
Community Psychiatry Clinic
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 38011
Email: lburckel@stjoes.ca 

Dr. Burckell received her Ph.D. in 2007 from Stony Brook University, and completed both a predoctoral and postdoctoral fellowship in the Borderline Personality Disorder Clinic at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto, Ontario. She joined the Borderline Personality Disorder Service at St. Joe’s in 2009 to head up the implementation of outpatient Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT). Dr. Burckell works at the two outpatient clinics offering Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) – Community Psychiatry Services and East Region Mental Health. As a psychologist in the Clinic, she conducts individual and group DBT therapy and psychological assessments. Dr. Burckell also supports educational initiatives throughout the region and provides consultation to other DBT programs. Dr. Burckell has published peer-reviewed journal articles, and has made a number of presentations at international scientific meetings. Dr. Burckell’s research focuses on therapeutic processes and outcome in the treatment of borderline personality disorder. Additionally, her research focuses on the evaluation of treatment for PTSD among individuals with co-occurring BPD and PTSD, and the influence of shame and self-compassion on the treatment outcomes for individuals participating in DBT.

Selected Publications:

Eubanks, C. E., Burckell, L. A., & Goldfried, M. R. (2010). Clinical consensus strategies for interpersonal problems between young adults and their parents. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 78, 212-224.

Burckell, L. A., & McMain, S. (2009)Substance use and personality disorders among women. (Back, S. Ed.) Women and Addiction: A Comprehensive Textbook.

Burckell, L.A., & Goldfried, M.R. (2006). Therapist qualities preferred by sexual minority individuals. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training.

Burckell, L. A., & Eubanks-Carter, C. (2005). Future directions of psychotherapy integration. In J.C. Norcross & M.R. Goldfried (Eds.), Future directions of psychotherapy integration: A roundtable. Journal of Psychotherapy Integration, 15, 392-471.

Eubanks-Carter, C., Burckell, L.A., & Goldfried, M.R. (2005). Future directions in psychotherapy integration: Research, practice, training, and theory. In J.C. Norcross & M.R. Goldfried (Eds.), Handbook of psychotherapy integration. New York: Oxford University Press.

Eubanks-Carter, C., Burckell, L.A., & Goldfried, M.R. (2005). Enhancing therapeutic effectiveness with gay, lesbian, and bisexual clients. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 12, 1-18.

Sabreena Chohan, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Sabreena Chohan, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
Bariatric Surgery Program
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 37338

Fax: 905-521-6152
Email: schohan@stjoes.ca 

Dr. Chohan received her doctoral degree in clinical psychology from Lakehead University in 2011.  Dr. Chohan’s clinical interests include the assessment and treatment of anxiety, mood, and eating disorders, along with body image concerns, self-esteem issues, and interpersonal difficulties among children, adolescents, and adults. Her research interests include the implications of social media on binge eating behaviour and body image concerns. At present, she works as a Staff Psychologist with the Bariatric Surgery team at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton in addition to providing assessment and treatment services to children, adolescents and adults in private practice. She is also a part-time Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University.

 

Christina Gojmerac, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Christina Gojmerac, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
Seniors Mental Health Program
Clinical Neuropsychology Service
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155 ext. 36299
Fax: 905-381-5610
Email: cgojmera@stjoes.ca

Dr. Christina Gojmerac received her Ph.D in 2009 from the University of Toronto and completed her internship at Baycrest Hospital in Toronto, Ontario. She is currently a clinical neuropsychologist at St. Joseph’s Healthcare in the Seniors Mental Health Program, and is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University.  Dr. Gojmerac’s clinical and research interests are in aging, cognition, and mental health.  Current research projects include a randomized control trial to investigate the effectiveness of a multi-factorial intervention program in seniors experiencing cognitive impairment, and a program evaluation of a memory intervention program for adults with mood disorders. 

Selected Publications:

Wiegand, M.A., Troyer, A.K., Gojmerac, C., & Murphy, K.J. (2013) Facilitating change inhealth-related behaviors and intentions: a randomized controlled trial of a multidimensional memory program for older adults.  Aging and Mental Health, 17(7), 806-815.

Ishii, R., Gojmerac, C., Stuss, D., Gallup, G.G.Jr, Alexander, M.P., Chau, W., & Christo, P. (2004). MEG Analysis of “Theory of Mind” in Emotional Vignettes Comprehension. Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, 28, 1-5.

Dixon, M.J., Desmarais, G., Gojmerac, C., Schweizer, T.A., & Bub, D. (2002). The role of premorbid expertise on object identification in a patient with category-specific visual agnosia. Cognitive Neuropsychology, 19(5), 401-419.

David A. Grant, Ph.D., C.Psych.

David A. Grant, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
Mood Disorders Program
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 39506
Email: dgrant@stjoes.ca 

Dr. Grant received his Ph.D. in 2012 from Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and completed his internship and post-doctoral fellowship in the Mood and Anxiety Program at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto, Ontario.  He is an Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. Dr. Grant's current clinical and research focus is on empirically-supported interventions in Mood and Anxiety Disorders, with specific emphasis on Cognitive-Behavioural and mindfulness-based approaches. He supervises psychology residents and practicum students at St. Joseph’s Healthcare in CBT for Mood and Anxiety Disorders, as well as in psychodiagnostic and other assessments. Dr. Grant is a member of the College of Psychologists of Ontario, the Canadian Psychological Association, and the Ontario Psychological Association.

Selected Publications:

Alloy, L. B., Bender, R. E., Whitehouse, W. G., Wagner, C. A., Liu, R. T., Grant, D. A., et al. (2012). High behavioral approach system (BAS) sensitivity and reward responsiveness predict first onset of bipolar spectrum disorders: A prospective behavioral high-risk design. Journal of Abnormal Psychology121, 339-351.

Bieling, P. J., & Grant, D. A. (2007). Toward bridging the science and practice of depression prevention: What can we learn from cognitive vulnerability?Canadian Psychology, 48, 240-255.

Cogswell, A., Alloy, L. B., Karpinski, A., & Grant, D. A. (2010). Assessing Dependency using Self-report and Indirect Measures: Examining the Significance of Discrepancies. Journal of Personality Assessment92, 306-316.

Grant, D. A., Bieling, P. J., Segal, Z. V., & Cochrane, M. M. (2013). Cognitive models and issues in depression. In M. Power (Ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell handbook of mood disorders (2nd ed.). Wiley-Blackwell.

Iacoviello, B. M., Grant, D. A., Alloy, L. B., & Abramson, L. Y. (2009). Cognitive personality characteristics impact the course of depression: A prospective test of sociotropy, autonomy and domain-specific life events. Cognitive Therapy and Research33, 187-198.

Stange, J. P., Shapero, B. G., Jager-Hyman, S., Grant, D. A., Abramson, L. Y., & Alloy, L. B. (2013). Behavioral approach system (BAS)-relevant cognitive styles in individuals with high vs. moderate BAS sensitivity: A behavioral high-risk design. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 37, 139-149.

Sheryl M. Green, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Sheryl M. Green, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Sheryl Green

Psychologist
Women's Health Concerns Clinic 
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155 x 33672
Fax: 905-521-6059
Email: sgreen@stjoes.ca

Dr. Green received her M.A. from York University and her Ph.D. from the University of Regina (2006). She completed her pre-doctoral internship at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto, ON. She currently works as a psychologist within the Women's Health Concerns Clinic and the Consultation Liaison Service at St. Joseph's and is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University.  Dr. Green’s clinical interests include cognitive behavioural and mindfulness-based interventions for depression, anxiety, and health-related difficulties. Research interests include developing cognitive-behavioural and mindfulness-based treatment protocols for specialized populations. Current projects include developing and evaluating 1) a cognitive-behavioural based group treatment program for perinatal anxiety and 2) a cognitive-behavioural based treatment program for menopausal symptoms. Dr. Green actively supervises psychology residents, psychiatry residents, psychology practicum students and CBS students within McMaster University. She has several publications in peer-reviewed journals, has presented at numerous professional conferences, and has co-authored one book.

Selected Publications: 

Green, S. M., Haber, E., McCabe, R. E., & Soares, C. N. (2013). Cognitive-behavioural group treatment for menopausal symptoms: A pilot study.Archives of Women’s Mental Health, 16, 325-332

Green, S. M., McCabe, R. E., & Soares, C. N. (November 2012). The cognitive behavioral workbook for menopause: A step by step program for overcoming hot flashes, mood swings, insomnia, depression, anxiety, and other symptoms. New Harbinger Publications: Oakland, CA.

Green, S. M., & Bieling, P. J. (2012). Expanding the scope of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy: Evidence for effectiveness in a heterogeneous psychiatric sample. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 19, 174-180.

Green, S. M. (2011). The importance of cognitive and behavioural factors in the experience and maintenance of menopausal symptoms. Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause Society, Vol 18, (11).

Green, S. M., Hadjistavropoulos, T., Hadjistavropoulos, H., Martin, R., & Sharpe, D. (2009). A controlled investigation of a cognitive behavioural pain management program for older adults. Journal of Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 37 (2), 221-226.

Brenda Key, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Brenda Key, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
Mood Disorders Program and
Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic
West 5th Campus

Tel:  905-522-1155, ext. 35375
Fax:  905-521-6120
E-mail: bkey@stjoes.ca

Dr. Key received her Ph.D. from the University of Calgary and completed her pre-doctoral residency training at Calgary Clinical Psychology Residency program.  She is a psychologist at the Mood Disorders Program and the Anxiety Treatment and Research Centre. She is currently completing a post-doctoral fellowship that involves both clinical and research components. Her clinical work is focused on the assessment and treatment of patients with co-morbid anxiety and mood disorders. Her research is focused on the development and evaluation of interventions that integrate cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and mindfulness based therapies (MBTs) for patients with anxiety and mood disorders. She is interested in mechanisms of change in CBT and MBTs such as changes in rumination, meta-cognition and emotion regulation. Dr. Key has published peer-reviewed journal articles and has made a number of presentations at scientific meetings.

Selected Publications:

Johnson, J.A.,  Key, B.L. , Routledge, F.S., Gerin, W., Campbell, T.S., Ph.D. (2014). High trait rumination is associated with blunted nighttime diastolic blood pressure dipping. Annals of Behavioural Medicine.Mills, J., Jadd, R., &Key, B.L. (2012). Wanting a body that's better than average:  The effect of manipulated body norms on ideal body size perception. Body Image: An International Journal of Research.

Key, B.L, Carlson, L., & Campbell, T.S. (2011, June). The Influence of 4-week Mindfulness Meditation intervention on Depressed Mood, Symptoms of Stress and Mindfulness. Poster session presented at the annual meeting of the Canadian Psychological Association, Toronto, ON.

Key, B.L, Carlson, L., & Campbell, T.S. (2011, June). Mindfulness is associated with decreased post stressor rumination compared to Distraction and Control Conditions. Poster session presented at the annual meeting of the Canadian Psychological Association, Toronto, ON.

Key, B.L., Ross, K.M., Bacon, S.L., Lavoie, K.L., & Campbell, T.S. (2009). Depressed affect is associated with poorer cardiovascular recovery in young women following a mental stressor. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 38 (2), 154-159.

Key, B.L., Campbell, T.S., Bacon, S.L., & Gerin, W. (2008). The influence of state and trait rumination on cardiovascular recovery from and emotional stressor. Journal of Behavioral Medicine,31(3), 237-248.

Campbell, T.S., Key, B.L., Ireland, A., Bacon, S.L., & Ditto, B. (2008). Early socioeconomic status is associated with adult nighttime blood pressure dipping. Psychosomatic Medicine, 70(3)276-282.

Jelena King, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Jelena King, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Associate Director of Training, Psychology Residency Program
Psychologist, Schizophrenia & Community Integration Service & Clinical Neuropsychology Service
West 5th Campus 

Tel: 905-522-1155 ext. 36299
Fax: 905-381-5610
E-mail: kingj@stjoes.ca

Dr. Jelena King received her Ph.D. in 2005 from the University of Waterloo, and completed a clinical internship at Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care and a postdoctoral fellowship in the Schizophrenia Program at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and Psychiatry Department, University of Toronto. Dr. King was employed as a psychologist in the Schizophrenia Program at the CAMH from 2006 to 2007 and then joined the Schizophrenia & Community Integration Service and Clinical Neuropsychology Service at St. Joseph’s Healthcare in a clinical research position that combines her primary interests of cognition in schizophrenia, neuropsychological and psychological assessment, psychotherapy and clinical training and teaching. Dr. King holds an academic appointment in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neuroscience at McMaster University. She is also the Associate Director of Training in the Psychology Residency Program at St. Joseph’s Healthcare, Hamilton.

Selected Publications:

King, J.P., Gojmerac, C.B., & McNeely, H.E. (2015). Psychological assessment of borderline personality disorder in geriatric patients. In: A Hategan, J.A. Borgeois, & G.L. Xiong (Eds.), Borderline Personality Disorder in Older Adults: Emphasis on Care in Institutional Settings. New York: Nova Science Publishers.

Wilkins, L.K., Girard, T.A., King, J.P., King, M., Herdman, K.A., Christensen, B.K., & King, J. (2013). Spatial-memory deficit in schizophrenia under viewpoint-independent demands in the virtual courtyard task.  Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 35(10):1082-93. doi: 10.1080/13803395.2013.857389. 

Christensen, B.K., Spencer, J. M. Y., King, J. P., Sekuler, A.B., & Bennett, P.J. (2013). Noise as a mechanism of anomalous face perception among persons with schizophrenia. Frontiers in Psychology, 13 (4) 507. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00507

Wilkins, L.K., Girard, T.A., Konishi, K., King, M., Herdman, K.A., King, J.P.,Christensen, B.K., & Bohbot, V. D. (2013). Selective deficit in spatial memory strategies contrast to intact response strategies in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders tested in a virtual navigation task.Hippocampus. 23(11):1015-24. doi: 10.1002/hipo.22189.

King, J.P., Christensen, B.K., & Westwood, D.A. (2008).Grasping behavior in schizophrenia suggests selective impairment in the dorsal pathway. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 117(4), pp. 799-811.

Wilson, C.M., Christensen, B.K., King, J.P., Li, Q., & Zelazo, P.D. (2008). Decomposing perseverative errors among undergraduates scoring high on the schizotypal personality scale. Schizophrenia Research, 106, pp. 3-12.

 

Michele Laliberté, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Michele Laliberté, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist and Director
Eating Disorders Program
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 34093
Fax: 905-540-6574
E-mail: mlaliber@stjoes.ca

Dr. Laliberté received her Ph.D. in 1994 from Queen's University, and completed her internship at Hotel Dieu Hospital in Kingston, Ontario. Dr. Laliberté is currently the Director of the Eating Disorders Program, St. Joseph’s Healthcare and Staff Psychologist specializing in Eating Disorders. Dr Laliberté also has extensive experience in treating anxiety and depression. Her current research, in collaboration with Dr. Ayra Sharma (Professor of Medicine, Canada Research Chair for Cardiovascular Obesity Research and Management), examines the role of beliefs regarding control over weight on disordered eating in obese and non-obese populations. She is also extending previous research she has published on family factors related to disordered eating, as well as collaborating on other studies related to eating disorders. Dr. Laliberté has developed a group treatment manual for eating disorders, currently used in this program and others across Ontario.

Selected Publications:

Laliberte, M., Balk, Tweed, S., D., Smith, J. & Ghai, A. (In Press). The impact of education on weight control beliefs.  Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care.

Laliberte, M., McCabe, R.E., & Taylor, V.H. (2009). The Cognitive Behavioral Workbook for Weight Management: A Step-by-Step Program. New Harbinger Publications .

Laliberte, M., Newton, M., McCabe, R., & Mills, J.S. (2007). Controlling your weight versus controlling your lifestyle: How beliefs about weight control affect risk for disordered eating, body dissatisfaction and self-esteem. Cognitive Therapy Research., 31, 853-869.

Laliberte, M., Mills, J., Newton, M., & McCabe, R. (2004). Perceived control over weight versus perceived control over lifestyle: Their relationship to disturbed eating and self-esteem. (abstract) International Journal of Eating Disorders, 35(4), 450.

Miller, J.L, Schmidt, L.A., Vaillancourt, T., McDougall, P., & Laliberte, M.(2006). Neuroticism and introversion: A risky combination for disordered eating among a non-clinical sample of undergraduate women. Eating Behaviors, 7(1), 69 – 78.

Laliberté, M., Mills, J., Newton, M., & McCabe, R. (2004). Perceived control over weight versus perceived control over lifestyle: Their relationship to disturbed eating and self-esteem (abstract). International Journal of Eating Disorders, 35, 450.

Laliberté, M., Boland, F., & Leichner, P. (1999). Family climate: Family factors specifically related to disturbed eating behaviors and bulimia nervosa. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 55, 1021-1040.

Bruno Losier, Ph.D., C.Psych. , ABPP-CN

 Bruno Losier, Ph.D., C.Psych. , ABPP-CN

Psychologist
Forensic Program
West 5th Campus 

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 35592
Fax: 905-381-5610
E-mail: losierb@stjoes.ca  

Dr. Losier received his Ph.D. in 1999 from Dalhousie University, and completed his internship at Camp Hill Medical Centre in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He is currently a senior staff neuropsychologist in the Clinical Neuropsychology Services. He is also assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. His current clinical and research interests include the neuropsychology of mental illness and acquired brain injuries, attentional deployment in three dimensional space, the impact of ECT on long term neuropsychological status, and, more recently, in the intersection between neuroscience and the law (e.g., decision making, freewill, deception, etc.) using functional imaging and other brain mapping tools. He has published over a dozen peer reviewed journal articles and has given numerous presentations at professional conferences.

Selected Publications:

Prat, S., Losier, B., Moulden, H, and Chaimowitz, G. (in press) Incapacity of the mind secondary to the medication misuse as a not criminally responsible (NCR) defense. Journal of Forensic Sciences

Bourgeois, J., Hategan, A, and Losier, B. (2014) Delirium in the Hospital Setting: Emphasis on Geriatric Patients. Current Psychiatry, 13(8) 36-43 

Bourgeois, J., Hategan, A, and Losier, B. (in press) Delirium in the Hospital Setting: Emphasis on Geriatric Patients. Current Psychiatry

McNair, S., Hategan, A., Bourgeois, J. and Losier, B. (2013) Neuropsychiatric symptoms in Scleroderma. Psychosomatics, 54(4) 382-386

Koblik, M., Kidd, S.A., Goldberg, J., & Losier, B.J. (2009) Learning processes and outcomes in computer skills training for persons with serious mental illness. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal. 32(4): 306-308

Losier, B.J., & Klein, R.M. (2004). Covert orienting within peripersonal and extrapersonal space: Young adults. Cognitive Brain Research, 19, 269-74.

Losier, B.J., & Klein, R.M. (2001). A review of the evidence for a disengage deficit following parietal lobe damage. Neuroscience Biobehavioral Review, 25,1-13.

McGlone J., Losier, B.J., Black, S.E. (1997). Are there sex differences in hemispatial visual neglect after unilateral stroke? Neuropsychiatry, Neuropsychology, and Behavioral Neurology, 10,125-34.

Losier, B.J., McGrath, P., & Klein, R.M. (1996). Error patterns on the continuous performance test in non-medicated and medicated samples of children with and

without ADHD: A meta-analytic review. Journal of Child Psychology, Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, 37, 971-987.

Losier, B.J., and Semba, K. (1993) Dual projections of single cholinergic and aminergic brainstem neurons to the thalamus and basal forebrain in the rat.Brain Research, 604, 41-52.

Emily MacKillop, Ph.D., C.Psych., ABPP-CN

Emily MacKillop, Ph.D., C.Psych., ABPP-CN

Psychologist
Clinical Neuropsychology Service
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 35592
Fax: 905-381-5610
E-mail: smckillo@stjoes.ca

Dr. MacKillop earned a B.A. from the University of Iowa and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Clinical Psychology at the State University of New York at Binghamton.  She went on to complete a one-year internship in Clinical and Neuropsychology at the Medical University of South Carolina, followed by a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in Neuropsychology at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center through Harvard Medical School.  In 2012, she earned board certification in Clinical Neuropsychology (ABPP).  From 2008-2011, she worked in independent practice and as a faculty member in the department of psychology at the University of Georgia, co-directing a Memory Assessment Clinic. From 2011-2014 she worked as a staff neuropsychologist for the Southeast Permanente Medical Group, serving Kaiser Permanente of Georgia.  She recently joined the neuropsychology service at St. Joseph’s Healthcare in the summer of 2014 and is also an Assistant Professor (PT) in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University.  Dr. MacKillop applies a holistic approach to treatment and intervention, incorporating medical, neurological, psychological, and behavioral factors as potentially contributing to the wellness of an individual.  Her research and clinical interests focus on this perspective, particularly as it pertains to aging and memory disorders, but also including medical and neurological illness, somatoform disorders, and symptom validity.

Selected Publications:

Castelda, B.A., Mattson, R.E., MacKillop, J., Anderson, E.J., & Donovick, P.J.
(2007). Psychometric validation of the Gambling Passion Scale (GPS) in an
English-speaking college sample. International Gambling Studies, 7, 173-182.

MacKillop, J. & Anderson, E.J. (2007). Further psychometric validation of the
Mindful Attention and Awareness Scale. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 29, 289-293.

MacKillop, J., Mattson, R.E., Anderson MacKillop, E.J., Castelda, B.A., &
Donovick, P.J. (2007). Multidimensional assessment of impulsivity in undergraduate hazardous drinkers and controls. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 68, 785-788.

Mattson, R.E., MacKillop, J., Castelda, B.A., Anderson, E.J., & Donovick, P.(2007). Factor structure of the Gambler’s Beliefs Questionnaire (GBQ) in an undergraduate gambling sample. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 30 (3), 229-234.

MacKillop, J., Anderson, E.J., Castelda, B., Mattson, R., & Donovick, P. (2006). Convergent validation of cognitive and behavioral assessment measures in pathological gamblers. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 20, 75-79.

Mini Mamak, Ed.D., C.Psych.

Mini Mamak, Ed.D., C.Psych.

Senior Psychologist Forensic Psychiatry Program
West 5th Campus
Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 36601
Fax: 905-575-6057
E-mail: mmamak@stjosham.on.ca

Dr. Mamak received her doctoral degree in 1997 from the OISE at the University of Toronto and completed her internship year at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (previously the Clarke Institute of Psychiatry) in Toronto. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences and the Senior Psychologist for the Forensic Psychiatry Program at St. Joseph’s Healthcare. Dr. Mamak is a co-developer of the electronic Hamilton Anatomy of Risk Management (eHARM) and the Aggressive Incidents Scale (AIS), two innovative methods of assessing and documenting risk. Dr. Mamak is also a member of the Ontario Review Board and is on the Board of Advisory for the Canadian Critical Incident Association. Dr. Mamak has significant experience working with offender populations and has worked with both provincial and federal corrections. In addition, she routinely consults with local and national police agencies, and is a frequent guest lecturer at the Canadian Police College. She has particular interests in the area of female offending, hostage negotiations, violent offending, and risk prediction.

Selected Publications: 

Cook, A. N., Moulden, H., M. Mamak, M., Lalani, S., Messina, K., & Chaimowitz, G. (2016). Validating the Hamilton Anatomy of Risk Management – Forensic Version and the Aggressive Incidents Scale. Assessment. Online First Jul 15, 2016. doi: 10.1177/1073191116653828

Choy, A. & Mamak, M. (2013), The Psychiatrist and Psychologist as Consultant to Law Enforcement. In Bloom, H., & Schneider, The Hon. Mr. Justice R..(Eds), Psychiatry and the Law in Canada. Centre for Addiction and Mental Health & Irwin Law.

Loza, W., Bloom, H., & Mamak, M. (2013). Understanding and Explaining Terrorism. In Bloom, H., & Schneider, The Hon. Mr. Justice R..(Eds), Psychiatry and the Law in Canada. Centre for Addiction and Mental Health & Irwin Law.

Zhu, N., Moulden, H.M., McNeely, H., & Mamak, M. (2013). The role of inattention in the relationship between major mental illness and crime. Journal of Forensic Psychology Practice, 13.

Moulden, H.M., Chaimowitz, G.A., Mamak, M. & Hawes, J. (2013). Understanding how sexual offenders compare across psychiatric and correctional settings: examination of Canadian mentally ill sexual offenders. Journal of Sexual Aggression, 19(1), 1-10.

Randi E. McCabe, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Randi E. McCabe, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Director, Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic
Psychologist-in-Chief, St. Joseph’s Healthcare
Manager, Eating Disorders, Clinical Neuropsychology
West 5th Campus
Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 33695
Fax: 905-521-6120
E-mail: rmccabe@stjoes.ca

Dr. McCabe is Director of the Anxiety Treatment and Research Centre and Psychologist-in-Chief at St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton.  She is also a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University where she is the CBT Anxiety Module Coordinator for the Postgraduate Psychiatry Psychotherapy Program. She is actively involved in training other mental health professionals and has given many workshops on conducting cognitive behavioural therapy and the treatment of anxiety disorders and eating disorders.  Dr. McCabe is on the editorial board of Cognitive and Behavioral Practice and she is a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee for The Canadian Institute for Obsessive Compulsive Disorders (CIOCD). She is also President of the Canadian Association of Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies.   Dr. McCabe has over 120 published articles, book chapters, and conference presentations on anxiety, eating disorders, and cognitive behavior therapy. She has disseminated her work broadly through publication of several CBT workbooks for clinicians and consumers including The Overcoming Bulimia Workbook (2003),10 Simple Solutions to Panic (2004)Overcoming Your Animal and Insect Phobias (2005), A Cognitive Behavioral Approach to Weight Management (2009) andThe Cognitive Behavioral Workbook for Menopause (2012).  She also coauthored Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Groups (2006) and most recently co-edited Phobias: The Psychology of Irrational Fear (2015). Her books have been translated into many languages including Chinese, Polish, Spanish, French, Italian, Dutch, Hebrew, and Japanese.  Her research interests focus on 1) variables affecting treatment outcome for anxiety disorders including motivation, process factors, and comorbidity; and 2) factors related to the phenomenology of anxiety and its disorders such as personality traits, life history, and information processing. 

Selected Publications (Past year):

Waechter, S., Rowa, K., Milosevic, I., Shnaider, P., Antony, M.M., & McCabe, R.E. (in press). Social anxiety and the accuracy of memory for childhood teasing frequency. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy.

Key, B., Rowa, K., Bieling, P.J., McCabe, R. E., & Pawluk, E. (in press). Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy as an Augmentation Treatment for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy.

Yoon, K.L., LeMoult, J., Hamedani, A., & McCabe, R.E. (2017). Working memory capacity and spontaneous emotion regulation in generalized anxiety disorder. Cognition and Emotion, 3, 1-7.

Vickers, K., Ein, N., Koerner, N., Kusec, A., McCabe, R.E., Rowa, K., & Antony, M. M. (2017). Self-reported hygiene-related behaviors among individuals with contamination-related obsessive-compulsive disorder, individuals with anxiety disorders and nonpsychiatric controls. Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders, 14, 71-83.

Gavric, D., Moscovitch, D.A., Rowa, K., & McCabe, R.E. (2017). Post-event processing in social anxiety disorder: Examining the mediating roles of positive metacognitive beliefs and perceptions of performance. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 91, 1-12.

Vella-Zarb, R.A., Cohen, J.N., McCabe, R.E., Rowa, K. (2017). Differentiating sexual thoughts in obsessive-compulsive disorder from paraphilias and nonparaphilic sexual disorders, Cognitive and Behavioural Practice, 24, 342-352.

McCabe, R.E., (in press). Foreword. In C. Beatriz Neufeld & B. Rangé (Eds.), Terapia cognitivo-comportamental em grupos: das evidências à prática. Porto Alegre, Brazil: Grupo A.

Rowa, K., McCabe, R.E., & Antony, M.M. (in press). Specific and social anxiety disorder. In J. Hunsley and E.J. Mash (Eds.), A guide to assessments that work, 2nd edition. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

McCabe, R.E., Farrell, N. (in press). Specific phobia: Treatment. In A.E. Wenzel (Ed.), The SAGE encyclopedia of abnormal and clinical psychology. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Nowakowski, M., & McCabe, R.E. (in press). Panic disorder: treatment. In A.E. Wenzel (Ed.), The SAGE encyclopedia of abnormal and clinical psychology. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Merrifield, C. & McCabe, R.E. (in press). Specific phobia. In A.E. Wenzel (Ed.), The SAGE encyclopedia of abnormal and clinical psychology. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Merrifield, C., & McCabe, R.E. Cognitive behavioral group therapy. In Amy E. Wenzel (Ed), The SAGE encyclopedia of abnormal and clinical psychology (in press).

Merrifield, C., & McCabe, R.E. Substance-induced anxiety disorder. In Amy E. Wenzel (Ed.), The SAGE encyclopedia of abnormal and clinical psychology (in press).

Merrifield, C., & McCabe, R.E. Substance/Medication-induced anxiety disorder. In Amy E. Wenzel (Ed.), The SAGE encyclopedia of abnormal and clinical psychology (in press).

Merrifield, C., & McCabe, R.E. Alcohol-induced anxiety disorder. In Amy E. Wenzel (Ed.), The SAGE encyclopedia of abnormal and clinical psychology (in press).

McCabe, R.E., Milosevic, I., Rowa, K., Shnaider, P., Key, B., Pawluk, E., Antony, M.M. & the DART Working Group. (2017). Diagnostic Assessment Research Tool (DART). Hamilton, ON: St. Joseph’s Healthcare/McMaster University.

Margaret McKinnon, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Margaret McKinnon, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist & Academic Head
Mood Disorders Program
Associate Professor and Associate Co-Chair, Research
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioural Neurosciences
McMaster University
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 35438
Email: mmckinno@stjoes.ca

Dr. McKinnon received her Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in 2003 and subsequently completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Centre.  She is Associate Co-Chair, Research in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University and a psychologist and Academic Head in the Mood Disorders Program at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton.  Dr. McKinnon is also an Associate Member of the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behavior and graduate faculty in the McMaster Institute for Neuroscience Study and Discovery (MiNDS program).  Dr. McKinnon’s research focuses on the interplay between cognitive and emotional processes at the neural and behavioral level. She is particularly interested in how emotion and cognition relate to autobiographical memory and social cognition, two areas of function commonly affected by neurological illness or insult. Most of her research has been conducted in special populations, including patients with frontotemporal dementia, medial temporal lobe amnesia and post-traumatic stress disorder, along with normally aging adults. With her collaborators, she is interested in identifying differences in autobiographical memory for highly emotional events (e.g., an airplane crash) and in social cognitive (e.g., theory of mind and empathy) performance between people with and without mood disorders and other psychiatric illnesses. An additional research focus concerns the neural mechanisms underlying these differences. Dr. McKinnon has held grant funding from the following sources: CIHR, CIMVHR , NARSAD, OMHF, and NIMH.  She is particularly interested in working with patients with complex behavioral presentations and patients with co-morbid mood and trauma-related disorders.

Selected Publications:

McKinnon, M.C., Palombo, D., Nazarov, A., Kumar, N., Khuu, W., & Levine, B. (in press).  Threat of death and autobiographical memory: A study of the passengers of Flight AT236.  Clinical Psychological Science.

Lanius, R., Frewen, P., Nazarov, A., & McKinnon, M.C. (2014). A social cognitive neuroscience approach to PTSD: Clinical & research perspectives.  In Lanius, U. F., Paulsen, S.L. & Corrigan, F.M. (Eds).  Neurobiology & Treatment of Traumatic Dissociation: Towards an Embodied Self.  Springer: New York.

Parlar, M., Frewen, P., Nazarov, A., ­, C., MacQueen, G., & Lanius*, R.,McKinnon*, M.C.   (2014). Altered empathic responding in women exposed to repeated developmental trauma. Brain and Behaviour. 13 MAR 2014, DOI: 10.1002/brb3.215.

Guo, Q., Parlar, M., Truong, W., Hall, G.B.C., Thabane, L.; McKinnon, M.C., Goeree, R., & Pullenayegum, E. (2014). The reporting of observational clinical functional magnetic resonance imaging studies: A systematic review.  PLOS ONE. Apr 22;9(4):e94412. doi: 10.1371/ journal.pone.0094412. eCollection 2014.

Guo, Q., Thabane, L., Hall, G.B.C., McKinnon, M.C., Goeree, R., & Pullenayegum, E. (2014). A systematic review of the reporting of sample size calculations and corresponding data components in observational functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. NeuroImage, 86, 172-181.

Nazarov, A., Frewen, P., Parlar, M., Oremus, C., MacQueen, G., & McKinnon*, M.C., Lanius*, R.  (2014). Theory of mind performance in women with posttraumatic stress disorder related to childhood abuse. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 129, 193-201.

King, M.J., MacDougall, A., Ferris, S., Herdman, K., Bielak, T., Smith, J., Abid, M.A., McKinnon, M.C. (2013).  Impaired episodic memory for events encoded during manic but not depressed or euthymic mood states in bipolar disorder. Psychiatry Research, 205, 213-219.

McKinnon, M.C., Cusi, A., &  MacQueen, G.  (2013).  Psychological factors that may confer risk for bipolar disorder.  Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, 18(1-2),115-128.

Cusi, A., Nazarov, A., MacQueen, G.M., & McKinnon, M.C. (2013) Theory of mind deficits in patients with mild symptoms of major depressive disorder. Psychiatry Research, 210, 672-674.

Meusel, L.A., Hall, G., Fougere, P., McKinnon, M.C., & MacQueen, G.M. (2013).  Neural correlates of cognitive remediation in patients with mood disorders. Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging214, 142-52.

Sandra McNally, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Sandra McNally, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Sandra McNally, PhD, C.Psych

Schizophrenia and Community Intergration Services 
West 5th Campus
St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton 
100 West 5th Street 
Hamilton, ON L8N 3K7

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 36789 
Fax: 905-381-5607 
E-mail: smcnally@stjoes.ca

Dr. McNally received her Ph.D. in 1996 from York University, and completed her internship at The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (formerly the Clarke Institute of Psychiatry).  She is currently a Staff Psychologist in the Schizophrenia and Community Integration Service at St. Joseph's Healthcare (West 5th Campus), and Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University.  Her clinical and research interests involve the psychotherapeutic treatment of psychotic disorders, including the phenomenology of voice hearing and delusions.

Selected Publications:

McNally, S.E., & Goldberg, J.O. (1997). Natural cognitive coping strategies in schizophrenia. British Journal of Medical Psychology, 70, 159-167.

Heather E. McNeely, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Heather E. McNeely, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Clinical Head
Clinical Neuropsychology Service
Psychologist
Schizophrenia & Community Integration Service
West 5th Campus
100 West 5th Street, Box 585
Hamilton, ON   L8N 3K7

Tel:  905-522-1155, ext. 36422
Fax: 905-381-5610
E-mail:  hmcneely@stjoes.ca

Dr. McNeely received her Ph.D. in 1999 from the University of Waterloo, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the event related potential (ERP) laboratory at the Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Centre and in the Neuropsychology Laboratory at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto. From 2001 to 2005, she was employed as a neuropsychologist in the Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program at CAMH and came to St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton in July 2005. Dr. McNeely was the Director of Training for the Clinical Psychology Residency Program from 2006-2017. She is an Associate Professor as well as the Director of Continuing Education in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster and holds an adjunct faculty appointment in the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour at McMaster University. Her clinical and research interests focus on the interplay between neurobiological, affective and cognitive processes in severe mental illness and the impact of psychiatric treatments (e.g., Deep Brain Stimulation, Electroconvulsive Therapy, medications) on cognition and functional outcome.

Selected Publications:

Pyrke RJ, McKinnon MC, McNeely HE, Ahern C, Langstaff KL & Bieling PJ (2017). Evidence-Based Design Features Improve Sleep Quality Among Psychiatric Inpatients. Health Environments Research & Design Journal, Article first published online: January 1, 2017    DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/1937586716684758

McInerney, S.J., McNeely, H.E., Geraci, J. Giacobbe, P. Rizvi, S.J., Ceniti, A.K., Cyriac, A., Mayberg, H.S., Lozano, A.M. & Kennedy, S.H. (accepted, Feb. 2017). Neurocognitive Predictors of Response in Treatment Resistant Depression to Subcallosal Cingulate Gyrus Deep Brain Stimulation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

Ahern, C., McKinnon, M.C., Bieling, P.J., McNeely, H.E., & Langstaff, K. (2016). Overcoming the challenges inherent in conducting design research in mental health settings: Lessons from St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton’s pre and post occupancy evaluation. Health Environments Research & Design Journal, 9(2), 119-129.

Oremus, C., Oremus, M., McNeely, H.E., Losier, B., Parlar, M., Hasey, G., Hall, G.B.C., King, M. The ECT & Cognition Systematic Review Team, Lanius, R. & McKinnon, M. (2015). Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy on Cognitive Functioning in Patients with Depression: Protocol for a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis, British Medical Journal, BMJ Open 2015;5: e006966. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006966

Nazarov, A., McNeely, H.E., Kiang, M., Lanius, R. & McKinnon, M. (2015). "Role of morality in the experience of guilt and shame within the armed forces". Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 1-16.

Zhu, N., Moulden, H.M., McNeely, H.E. & Mamak, M. (2013). The Role of Inattention in the Relationship between Mental Illness and Crime. The Journal of Forensic Psychology Practice, 13, 28-39.

McNeely, H.E., Lau, M.A., Christensen, B.K. & Alain, C. (2008). Neurophysiological evidence of cognitive inhibition anomalies in persons with major depressive disorder. Clinical Neurophysiology, 119, 1578-1589.

McNeely, H.E., Mayberg, H.S., Lozano, A.M. & Kennedy, S.H. (2008). Neuropsychological impact of Cg25 deep brain stimulation for treatment-resistant depression: preliminary results over 12 months. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. 196(5):405-10.

Rybak, Y., McNeely, H.E., Mackenzie, B., Jain U. & Levitan, R.D. (2007). Seasonality and circadian preference in adult ADHD: Clinical and neuropsychological correlates. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 48, 562-571.

Meyer, J.H., McNeely, H.E., Sagrati, S., Boovariwala, A., Martin, K., Verhoeff, N.P.L.G., Wilson, A.A., & Houle, S. (2006). Elevated putamen D2 receptor binding potential In major depression with motor retardation: An [11C] raclopride positron emission tomography study. American Journal of Psychiatry, 163, 1594-1602.

Mayberg, H., Lozano, A.M., Voon, V., Kennedy, S.K., McNeely, H.E., Hamani, C., Schwalb, J.M., Seminowicz, D. (2005). Deep brain stimulation for treatment-resistant depression. Neuron, 45, 1-10.

Irena Milosevic, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Irena Milosevic, Ph.D., C.Psych.

 

Psychologist
Anxiety Treatment & Research Clinic
St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton
West 5th Campus
Hamilton, ON  L8N 3K7

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 32969
E-Mail: imilosev@stjoes.ca

Dr. Milosevic received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Concordia University and completed her pre-doctoral residency at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton (SJHH). She is currently a psychologist at the Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic at SJHH, where her role involves clinical service, research, and teaching. She also holds an appointment as Assistant Professor (PT) in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. Dr. Milosevic’s clinical interests include assessment and cognitive behavioural treatment (CBT) of anxiety and related disorders. Her research investigates treatment outcomes and mechanisms in CBT for anxiety and related disorders and comorbid anxiety, mood, and substance use disorders. Dr. Milosevic has authored a number of peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters, and she has presented her research at numerous national and international conferences.

Selected Publications:

Milosevic, I., Levy, H. C., Alcolado, G. M., & Radomsky, A. S. (in press). The Treatment Acceptability/Adherence Scale: Moving beyond the assessment of treatment effectiveness. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy.

Milosevic, I., & McCabe, R. E. (Eds.) (2015). Phobias: The psychology of irrational fear. Santa Barbara, CA: Greenwood.

Milosevic, I., & McCabe, R. E. (2015). Agoraphobia. In R. Cautin & S. Lilienfeld (Eds.), The encyclopedia of clinical psychology. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.

McCabe, R. E., Milosevic, I., & Bieling, P. J. (2014). Groups for anxiety and PTSD. In J. De-Lucia Waack, C. Kalonder, & M. Riva (Eds.), The handbook of group counseling and psychotherapy (2nd Ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Rowa, K., Gifford, S., McCabe, R. E., Milosevic, I., Antony, M. M., & Purdon, C. (2014). Treatment fears in anxiety disorders: Development and validation of the Treatment Ambivalence Questionnaire. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 70, 979-993. 

Rowa, K., Milosevic, I., & Antony, M. M. (2014). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder: Applying the approach. In J. Weeks (Ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell handbook of social anxiety disorder. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.

Milosevic, I., & Radomsky, A.S. (2013). Incorporating the judicious use of safety behaviour into exposure-based treatments for anxiety disorders: A study of treatment acceptability. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, 27, 155-174.

Milosevic, I., & Radomsky, A.S. (2013). Keep your eye on the target: Safety behavior promotes lower levels of targeted maladaptive beliefs following a behavioral experiment. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 37, 557-571.

Heather M. Moulden, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Heather M. Moulden, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Forensic Service
West 5th Campus
100 West 5th Street
Hamilton, ON L8N 3K7
Tel:  905-522-1155 ext. 35539
Fax:  905-575-6057
E-mail:  hmoulden@stjoes.ca

Heather Moulden received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Ottawa, and completed her residency at St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton. She is a clinical forensic psychologist on the Forensic Service at St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, and an assistant professor with the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. Heather's research and clinical interests include sexual deviations and offending behaviour, enhancing forensic rehabilitation, and diagnostic issues relevant to risk and treatment. She has authored peer reviewed publications, invited chapters, and has presented at scholarly conferences in Canada and the United States. She also provides training in sexual offender treatment and forensic rehabilitation for correctional services and other agencies.

Publications:

Moulden, H. M., Chaimowitz, G., Mamak, M. & Hawes, J.  (in press). Understanding how sexual offenders compare across psychiatric and correctional settings: Examination of Canadian mentally ill sexual offenders.Journal of Sexual Aggression.

Moulden, H. M. & Firestone, P.(2011). Therapist awareness and responsibility in treating sexual offenders. Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment, 23, 374-386.

Moulden, H. M., Firestone, P., Kingston, D. A., & Wexler, A. F.(2010). A description of sexual offending committed by Canadian teachers. Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, 19, 403-418

Moulden, H. M., Firestone, P., Kingston, D. A., & Bradford, J. M. (2009). Recidivism in pedophiles: An investigation using different diagnostic methods.Journal of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology, 20, 680-691.

Firestone, P., Moulden, H. M., & Wexler, A. F. (2009). Clerics who commit sexual offenses: Offender, offence and victim characteristics. Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, 18, 442-454.

Marshall, L. E., Marshall, W. L., Moulden, H. M., & Serran, G. E. (2008). The prevalence of sexual addiction in incarcerated sexual offenders and matched community controls. Sexual Addiction and Compulsivity, 15, 271-283.

Marshall, W. L., Marshall, L. E., Malcolm, P. B., Fernandez, Y. M., & Moulden, H. M. (2008).The Rockwood Preparatory Program For Sexual Offenders: Description and preliminary appraisal. Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment, 20, 25-41.

Kingston, D. A., Firestone, P., Moulden, H. M., & Bradford, J. M. (2007). The utility of thediagnosis of pedophilia: A comparison of various classification procedures. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 36, 423-436.

Moulden, H. M., & Firestone, P. (2007). Vicarious traumatization: The impact on therapists who work with sexual offenders. Trauma, Violence & Abuse, 8,67-83.

Moulden, H. M., Firestone, P., & Wexler, A. F. (2007). Childcare providers who commit sexual offences: A description of offender, offense, and victim characteristics. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 51, 384-406.

Nunes, K. L., Hanson, R. K., Firestone, P., Moulden, H. M., Greenberg, D. M., & Bradford, J. M. (2007). Denial predicts recidivism for some sexual offenders. Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment, 19, 91-105.

Serran, G. A., Firestone, P., Marshall, W. L., & Moulden, H. M. (2007). Changes in coping strategies following treatment in child molesters. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 22, 1199-1210.

Joseph Pellizzari, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Joseph Pellizzari, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
Consultation-Liaison Service, Mental Health and Addictions Program
4th floor, Fontbonne Building
St. Joseph's Healthcare, 50 Charlton Ave East
Hamilton, ON L8N 4A6

Tel: 905-522-1155 ext. 34258
E-mail: jpellizz@stjoes.ca

Dr. Joseph Pellizzari received his Ph.D. in 2000 from the University of Western Ontario, following the completion of his internship at Victoria Hospital (London Health Sciences Centre). Prior to joining the faculty at St. Joseph's Healthcare in 2008, he was employed with the Mental Health Care Program at London Health Sciences Centre for over 10 years, working in the areas of consultation-liaison (CL) psychiatry and behavioural medicine.  This continues to be his area of practice and he is currently the administrative service leader for CL which has interprofessional teams located at all the acute medical sites in the city.  Clinically, his practice involves the assessment and treatment of patients with complex medical and psychiatric presentations, including mood, anxiety, and somatoform disorders.  He has developed clinical liaisons with a variety of medical services including interventional pain management, respirology, and palliative care.  Of particular interest has been the delivery of psychological services (e.g., consultation, brief intervention) in the acute care medical/surgical setting. Dr. Pellizzari has also been active in education; teaching aspects of psychosomatic medicine to undergraduate medical students, supervising psychology and psychiatry residents, and participating in various educational initiatives with other medical specialties.  Research interests have included the conceptualization and measurement of quality of life and health outcomes. He is an Assistant Professor with the McMaster Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences.

Karen Rowa, Ph.D., C.Psych.

 

Karen Rowa, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Director of Training, Psychology Residency Program
Psychologist, Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 33656
Fax: 905-521-6120
E-mail: krowa@stjoes.ca 

Dr. Rowa received her Ph.D. in 2003 from the University of Waterloo, and she completed her internship training at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto, Ontario. She is a psychologist at the Anxiety Treatment and Research Centre and an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. She is also the Director of Training in the Psychology Residency Program at St. Joseph’s. Her research is focused on evaluating cognitive behavioural models and treatments of the anxiety disorders, with a specific focus on obsessive compulsive disorder and social anxiety disorder. She also studies problematic hoarding.

Selected Publications:

Waechter, S., Rowa, K., Milosevic, I., Shnaider, P., Antony, M.M., & McCabe, R.E. (in press). Social anxiety and the accuracy of memory for childhood teasing frequency. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy.

Key, B., Rowa, K., Bieling, P.J., McCabe, R.E., & Pawluk, E.J. (in press). Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy as an augmentation treatment for obsessive compulsive disorder. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy.

Gavric, D., Moscovitch, D.A., Rowa, K., & McCabe, R.E. (2017). Post-event processing in Social Anxiety Disorder: Examining the mediating roles of positive metacognitive beliefs and perceptions of performance. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 91, 1-12.

Vella-Zarb, R.A., Cohen, J.N., McCabe, R.E., & Rowa, K. (2017). So you think you know OCD? Differentiating sexual thoughts in OCD from paraphilias and nonparaphilic sexual disorders. Cognitive and Behavioural Practice, 24, 342-352.

Rowa, K., Gavric, D., Stead, V., LeMoult, J., & McCabe, R.E. (2017). The pernicious effects of post-event processing in social anxiety disorder. Journal of Experimental Psychopathology, 7, 577-587.

Farrell, N.R., Ouimet, A.J., Rowa, K., Soreni, N., Swinson, R.P., & McCabe, R.E. (2016). Who gets better when? An investigation of change patterns in group cognitive behavioural therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Journal of Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders, 10, 35-41.

Peter Sheridan, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Peter Sheridan, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist, Forensic Psychiatry Program
St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton
West 5th Campus
100 West 5th Street
Hamilton ON  L8N 3K7

Telephone:  905-522-1155 ext. 39319
Fax:  905-381-5605
Email:  psherida@stjoes.ca

Peter Sheridan received his B.Sc. with Specialization in Psychology from Trinity College, University of Toronto, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from York University.  He completed his internships at the Wellesley Hospital and at the Forensic Service, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.  Dr. Sheridan received a SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship for his research on the impact of gender, sexual orientation, and relationship status on judgements about victims of sexual assault.  He has published and presented in the areas of sexual and gender identity, antigay violence, and sexual and relationship violence.  Dr. Sheridan has provided clinical services for both the provincial and federal ministries of corrections and, most recently, was the Chief Psychologist at Grand Valley Institution for Women, the largest federal women’s prison in Canada.  He is trained in psychodynamic, CBT, and DBT approaches to treatment.  He maintains a private practice in Toronto with a focus on assessment for criminal and civil proceedings and treatment and consultation for offenders returned to the community on parole or probation.

Selected Publications: 

Sheridan, P. M. (2013, September). Working with female offenders. Professional development workshop presented at the Early Career Psychology Group, Correctional Service Canada, Kingston, Ontario.

Sheridan, P. M., & Goodwin, R. (2002, March). Compounding the harm to male victims of sexual violence. Paper presented at Canadian Boys: Untold Stories, Toronto, Ontario.

Sheridan, P. M. (1997). Group counselling for gay male youth. In M. S. Schneider (Ed.), Pride and prejudice: Working with lesbian, gay and bisexual youth (pp. 83-96). Toronto: Central Toronto Youth Services.

Stermac, L., Sheridan, P. M., Davidson, A., & Dunn, S. (1996). Sexual assault of adult males.  Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 11, 52-64.

Sheridan, P. M., & Hucker, S. J. (1994). Rape and sadomasochistic paraphilias. In J. Krivacska & J. Money (Eds.), The handbook of forensic sexology: Biomedical and criminological perspectives (pp. 104-125). Amherst, NY: Prometheus.

Stermac, L. E., & Sheridan, P. M. (1993). The developmentally disabled adolescent sex offender. In H. E. Barbaree, W. L. Marshall, & S. M. Hudson (Eds.), The juvenile sex offender (pp. 235-242). New York: Guilford Press.

Juliana I Tobon, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Juliana I Tobon, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist, Youth Wellness Centre
38 James Street South
Hamilton ON L8P 4W6 

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 39167
Fax: 905-527-8291
E-mail: jtobon@stjoes.ca 

Dr. Tobon is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster and a Psychologist with the Youth Wellness Centre at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton. Before coming to St. Joseph’s Healthcare, she was a postdoctoral fellow at the Offord Centre for Child Studies and McMaster University, working on the 2014 Ontario Child Health Study under Drs. Michael Boyle and Kathy Georgiades. She completed her predoctoral internship at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in the Child, Youth, and Family Services. Dr. Tobon received her Ph.D. in 2013 from the University of Western Ontario. For her doctoral dissertation, Dr. Tobon developed a new measure of continuity of care in children’s mental health.

Selected Publications:

Tobon, J.I., Reid, G.J., Brown, J.B. (2015). Continuity of care in children’s mental health: Parent, youth, and providerl perspectives. Accepted for publication. Community Mental Health Journal. DOI 10.1007/s10597-015-9873-5

Tobon, J.I., Reid, G.J., Goffin, R. (2014). Continuity of care in children’s mental health: Development of a measure. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 41(5), 668-686.DOI 10.1007/s10488-013-0518-0

Tobon, J.I., Reid, G.J., Goffin, R. (2013). Continuity of care in children’s mental health: Development of a measure. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research. DOI: 10.1007/s10488-013-0518-0

Tobon, J.I., Ouimet, A.J., Dozois, D.A. (2011). Attentional bias in anxiety disorders following cognitive behavioural treatment. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, 25(2), 114-129.

Tobon, J.I., Eichstedt, J., Phoenix, E., Wolfe, V., Brisebois, S., Zayed, R. & Harris, K. (2011). Group cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety in a clinical setting: Does child involvement predict outcome? Behavior Therapy, 42, 306-322.

 

Stacey Tweed, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Stacey Tweed, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
Eating Disorders Program
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155 ext. 34263
E-Mail: stweed@stjoes.ca

Dr. Tweed received a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from York University in Toronto, ON and completed her pre-doctoral residency training at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton (SJHH). Dr. Tweed’s research interests include examining factors relevant to the treatment of eating disorders (e.g., emotion regulation, motivation, self efficacy beliefs), as well as the prevention of disordered eating behaviours more generally. Dr. Tweed has co-authored a number of peer-reviewedjournal articles and has presented her work at numerous international conferences.

Selected Publications:

Davis, C., Patte, K., Levitan, R., Reid, C., & Tweed, S. (2007). From motivation to behaviour: A model of reward sensitivity, overeating, and food preferences in the risk profile for obesity. Appetite, 48(1), 12-19.

Davis, C., Patte, K., Tweed, S., & Curtis, C. (2007). Personality traits associated with decision-making deficits. Personality and Individual Differences, 42(2), 279-290.

Ferrari, M., Tweed, S., Rummens, J. A., Skinner, H., & McVey, G. (2009). Health materials and strategies for the prevention of immigrants’ weight-related problems. Qualitative Health Research, 19(9), 1259-1272.

Kirsh, G., McVey, G., Tweed, S., & Katzman, D. K. (2007). Psychosocial profiles of young adolescent females seeking treatment for an eating disorder. Journal of Adolescent Health, 40(4), 351-356.

Laliberte, M. M., Balk, D., Tweed, S., Smith, J. & Ghai, A. (2014). The impact of education on weight control beliefs. Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, 7(2), 86-95.

McVey, G., Davis, R., Tweed, S., & Shaw, B. F. (2004). Evaluation of a school-based program designed to improve body image satisfaction, global self-esteem, and eating attitudes and behaviors: A replication study. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 36(1), 1-11.

McVey, G., Gusella, J., Tweed, S., & Ferrari, M. (2009). A controlled evaluation of web-based training for teachers and public health practitioners on the prevention of eating disorders. Eating Disorders: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention, 17(1), 1-26.

McVey, G., Tweed, S., & Blackmore, E. (2007). Health Schools-Healthy Kids: A controlled evaluation of a comprehensive universal eating disorder prevention program. Body Image, 4(2), 115-136.

McVey, G., Tweed, S., & Blackmore, E. (2005). Correlates of weight loss and muscle gaining behavior in 10- to 14- year old males and females. Preventive Medicine: An International Journal Devoted to Practice and Theory, 40(1), 1-9.

McVey, G., Tweed, S., & Blackmore, E. (2004). Dieting among preadolescent and young female adolescents. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 170(10), 1559-1561.

Tweed, S. R. (2013). Group-based emotion focused therapy (EFT) for women with binge spectrum eating disorders in an outpatient setting: A preliminary comparison. Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering, 75(7-B).

 

Michael Coons, Ph.D., C.Psych.CBSM

Michael Coons, Ph.D., C.Psych.CBSM

Michael Coons Photo

Psychologist,Bariatric Surgery Program
West 5th Campus
Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 37338
Fax: 905-521-6152
E-mail: mcoons@stjosham.on.ca

Dr. Coons is a Clinical, Health, and Rehabilitation Psychologist with the Medical Bariatric Program at S. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton. He completed his PhD in Clinical Psychology at the University of Waterloo, and clinical residency in Medical Psychology at Duke University Medical Centre. He is a registered member of the College of Psychologists of Ontario, College of Alberta Psychologists, and Illinois State Psychology Board, and holds a board certification in Behavioural Sleep Medicine with the American Board of Sleep Medicine. Prior to joining SJHH in 2015, Dr. Coons was the Director of Research in Primary Care at Markham Stouffville Hospital, and Program Director and Instructor for the inaugural Health Coaching Institute at York University. He is also a member of the Centre for Child Nutrition Health and Development at the University of Toronto, and Banting & Best Diabetes Centre. Dr. Coons holds faculty appointments in the Department of Family & Community Medicine at the University of Toronto, and Department of Psychology at York University. In terms of professional service, Dr. Coons has been an appointed member of the Obesity Scientific Committee of the American Heart Association (2012-2014; 2014-2016), where he co-authors scientific statements related to obesity to inform public policy, research, and clinical practice. He has also been appointed to the Health Education and Lifestyle Management committee (formerly the National Nutrition Committee) of the Canadian Diabetes Association (2015-2017), and is an invited content expert for the Canadian Diabetes Association 2018 Clinical Practice Guidelines. He has published over 40 peer-review journal articles and book chapters related to these topics.

Selected Publications: Schneider, K., Coons, M.J., deMott, A, et al. (in press). Mechanisms of change in diet and activity in the Make Better Choices Trial. Health Psychology, 00, 000-000.

Poncela-Casasnovas, J., McClary, D., Moller, A.C., Mukogo, R., Pellegrini, C., Coons, M.J., Davidson, M., Mukherjee, S., Amaral, L.A.N., & Spring, B. (in press). Social network predictors of weight loss in an online weight management community. Journal of the Royal Society Interface, 12, 1-12.

Coons, M.J., DeMott, A., Buscemi, J., Duncan, J.M., Pellegrini, C.A., Steglitz, J., Pictor, A., & Spring, B. (2012). Technology Interventions to Curb Obesity: A Systematic Review of the Current Literature. Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports, 6, 120-134.

Spring, B., Moller, A.C., & Coons, M.J. (2012). Multiple health behaviors: Overview and implications. Journal of Public Health, 34(S1), i3-i10.

Rao, G., Burke, L., Spring, B., Ewing, L., Turk, M., Lichtenstein, A., Cornier, M.A., Spence, D., Wang, J., & Coons, M.J. (2011). New and emerging weight management strategies for busy ambulatory settings: A scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation, 124, 1-22.

Coons, M.J., Roehrig, M., & Spring, B. (2011). The potential of virtual reality to improve adherence to weight loss behaviors. Journal of Diabetes Science & Technology, 5, 340-344.

Hoffman, B.M., Babyak, M., Craighead, W.E., Sherwood, A., Doraiswamy, P.M., Coons, M.J., & Blumenthal, J.A. (2011). Exercise and pharmacotherapy in patients with major depression: One-year follow-up of the SMILE study. Psychosomatic Medicine, 73, 127-133.

Colleen Merrifield, Ph.D., C. Psych.

Colleen Merrifield, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
Mood Disorders Program
St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton
Tel: 905-630-0856, ext. 36735
Fax: 905-521-6120
E-mail: cmerrifi@stjoes.ca

Dr. Merrifield received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Waterloo, where she held a Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship. She completed her predoctoral residency at the University of Ottawa and the Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre. Prior to her current position in the Mood Disorders Program, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship at SJHH in both the Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic and the Mood Disorders Program. In her current role as a psychologist in the outpatient Mood Disorders Clinic, her work focuses on integrating clinical practice, research, and teaching. She also holds a part-time appointment as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. Clinically, Dr. Merrifield’s interest lies in the assessment and cognitive behavioural treatment of mood, anxiety, and related disorders and she is a founding member of the Canadian Association of Cognitive and Behavioural Therapies. Her research focuses on the development, evaluation, and dissemination of transdiagnostic CBT treatments for mood and anxiety disorders. Dr. Merrifield has published a number of peer-reviewed manuscripts and book chapters and has made numerous presentations both in the Hamilton community and at national and international professional conferences.

Selected Publications:

Danckert, J., & Merrifield, C. (in press). Boredom, sustained attention and the default mode network. Experimental Brain Research.

Merrifield, C., & McCabe, R.E. Specific phobia. In Amy E. Wenzel (Ed.), The SAGE encyclopedia of abnormal and clinical psychology (in press).

Merrifield, C., & McCabe, R.E. Cognitive behavioral group therapy. In Amy E. Wenzel (Ed.), The SAGE encyclopedia of abnormal and clinical psychology (in press).

Merrifield, C., & McCabe, R.E. Alcohol-induced anxiety disorder. In Amy E. Wenzel (Ed.), The SAGE encyclopedia of abnormal and clinical psychology (in press).

Merrifield, C., & Danckert, J. Characterizing the psychophysiological signature of boredom (2014). Experimental Brain Research, 232, 481-491. doi: 10.1007/s00221-013-3755-2

Merrifield, C., Balk, D., & Moscovitch, D. A. (2013). Self-portrayal concerns mediate the relationship between recalled teasing and social anxiety in adults with anxiety disorders. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 27, 456-460. doi: 10.1016/j.janxdis.2013.05.007

Malkovsky, E., Merrifield, C.,Goldberg, Y. K., & Danckert, J. (2012). Exploring the relationship between boredom and sustained attention. Experimental Brain Research, 222, 57-69. doi: 10.1007/s00221-012-3147-z

Moscovitch, D. A., Gavric, D. L., Merrifield, C., Bielak, T., & Moscovitch, M. (2011). Retrieval properties of negative versus positive mental images and autobiographical memories in social anxiety: Outcomes with a new measure. Behavior Research and Therapy, 49, 505-517. doi: 10.1016/j.brat.2011.05.009

Merrifield, C., Hurwitz, M., & Danckert, J. (2010). Multimodal temporal perception deficits in a patient with left spatial neglect. Cognitive Neuroscience, 1, 244-253. doi: 10.1080/17588921003759934

Elena Ballantyne, Psy.D., C.Psych.

Elena Ballantyne, Psy.D., C.Psych.

Dr. E. Ballantyne

Psychologist
Clinical Neuropsychology Service
West 5th Campus
Tel: 905-522-1155 ext. 39366
E-mail: eballant@stjosham.on.ca

Dr. Ballantyne obtained a B.A. with Honours in Psychology from Queen’s University in 2004. She completed a Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology with a specialization in Clinical Neuropsychology at the Adler School of Professional Psychology in Chicago, Illinois. She completed her residency at St. Joseph’s Healthcare in Hamilton, Ontario and completed her supervised practice and post-doctoral fellowship jointly at St. Joseph’s Healthcare and Bieman-Copland and Associates in St. Catharines, Ontario. She has worked as a licensed Clinical Neuropsychologist in the Clinical Neuropsychology Service and in independent practice since 2014 and her area of practice is with adults and seniors with an emphasis on traumatic brain injury and aging disorders. Her areas of interest include neuropsychological assessment, psychotherapy after brain injury, and cognitive rehabilitation in addition to clinical training and teaching. Dr. Ballantyne’s treatment approach is client-centered and integrates cognitive-behavioural therapy, acceptance and commitment therapy, and neuropsychotherapy. Her research interests are in the supervision of psychology students and program evaluation.

Selected Publications:

Cummings, J.A., Ballantyne, E.C., & Scallion, L. (2015). Essential processes for clinical supervision: Agenda setting, problem-solving, and formative feedback. Psychotherapy, 52(2):158-163.

 Cummings, J.A. & Ballantyne, E.C. (2014). What does bad supervision look like? The Behavior Therapist, 37(8):230-235.

Burns, A.S., Delparte, J.J., Ballantyne, E.C., & Boschen, K.A. (2013). Evaluation of an interdisciplinary program for chronic pain following spinal cord injury. Pain Management & Rehabilitation, 5(10):832-832.

Elmar Gardizi, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Elmar Gardizi, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist
Cleghorn Early Intervention Clinic
St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton
West 5th Campus, Hamilton
Tel: 905-522-1155 Ext. 33883
Fax: 905-525-2805
Email: egardizi@stjosham.on.ca

Dr. Elmar Gardizi received his Ph.D. from the University of Windsor in 2015 and completed his internship and postdoctoral training at St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University with primary rotations in the Clinical Neuropsychology Service, Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic, and the Cleghorn Early Intervention Clinic.  Dr. Gardizi is currently employed as a psychologist at the Cleghorn Early Intervention Clinic where he provides neuropsychological assessment and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to individuals with first episode psychosis. His research interests primarily focus on the assessment cognitive functioning and outcome in traumatic brain injury as well as first episode psychosis.

Selected Publications:

Gardizi, E., Hanks, R., Millis, S. R., & Figueroa, M. (2014). Comorbidity and insurance as predictors of disability following traumatic brain injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 95(12), 2396-2401. 

Gardizi, E., Millis, S. R., Hanks, R., & Axelrod, B. (2012). Analysis of the Postconcussive Syndrome Questionnaire: Measuring the core construct of brain injury symptomatology. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 26(6), 869-878.          

Matilda Nowakowski, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Matilda Nowakowski, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Psychologist 
Pain Clinic, King Campus
Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 38610
Fax: 905-573-4845
E-mail: mnowakow@stjoes.ca

Dr. Nowakowski received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Ryerson University in 2014 and her Ph.D., in experimental psychology from McMaster University in 2009.  She completed her pre-doctoral residency at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton as well as a postdoctoral fellowship at the Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic at St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton and the Digestive Diseases Clinic at McMaster University Medical Centre.  She is currently working as a Psychologist in the Pain Clinic at St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton (King Campus) and is an Assistant Clinical Professor (PT) in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University.  Dr. Nowakowski's clinical interests include cognitive-behavior therapy and mindfulness-based interventions for patients with chronic pain, anxiety and related disorders, and depression. Dr. Nowakowski’s research focuses on examining the predictors and mediators of treatment outcome in patients with chronic pain and anxiety and related disorders as well as evaluating the integration of psychological treatments, especially cognitive-behaviour therapy, into medical settings.  She has several publications in peer-reviewed journals and has presented at numerous national and international conferences.    

Selected Publications:

Nowakowski, M.E., Rowa, K. Antony, M.M., & McCabe, R.E. (in press). Changes in anxiety sensitivity following group cognitive-behaviour therapy for social anxiety disorder and panic disorder. Cognitive Therapy and Research.

Nowakowski, M.E., & McCabe, R.A. (in press). Panic disorder: Treatment. In A.E. Wenzel (Ed.), The SAGE encyclopedia of abnormal and clinical psychology. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

Nowakowski, M.E., McCabe, R., Rowa, K., Surette, M., Moayyedi, P., & Anglin, R. (2016). The gut microbiome: Potential implications for the understanding and treatment of psychopathology. Canadian Psychology, 57, 67-75.

Nowakowski, M.E., Antony, M.M., & Koerner, N. (2015). Modifying interpretation biases: Effects on symptomatology, behavior, and physiological reactivity in social anxiety. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 49, 44-52.

Nowakowski, M.E., & Antony, M.M. (2015). Anxiety and Related Disorders. In R. McCabe & I Milosevic (Eds.), Phobias: The psychology of irrational fear, an encyclopedia. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO.

Nowakowski, M.E. (2015). Cognitive bias modification. In R. McCabe & I Milosevic (Eds.), Phobias: The psychology of irrational fear, an encyclopedia. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO.

Gee, B.A., Nowakowski, M.E., & Antony, M.M. (2015). Hypochondriasis/illness anxiety disorder. In R. Cautin, & S. Lilienfeld (Eds.), The Encyclopedia of clinical psychology. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.

Nowakowski, M.E., & Antony, M.M. (2013). Reactions to teasing in social anxiety. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 37, 1091-1100.

Nowakowski, M.E., Rogojanski, J., & Antony, M.M. (2013).  Specific phobia.  In S.G. Hofmann (Ed.), Wiley handbook of cognitive behavioral therapy. Volume 2: CBT for specific disorders. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.

Nowakowski, M.E., McFarlane, T., & Cassin, S. (2013). Alexithymia and eating disorders: A critical review. Journal of Eating Disorders, 1:21.

 

Caitlin Davey, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Caitlin Davey, Ph.D., C.Psych.
Psychologist
Mood Disorders Program
St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton 100 West 5th Street
Hamilton, ON  L8N 3K7
Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 35542
Email: cdavey@stjosham.on.ca

Dr. Caitlin Davey received her Ph.D. from the Ryerson University in 2015 and completed her internship at St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University with primary rotations in the Mood Disorders Service, Eating Disorders Clinic and Health Psychology. Dr. Davey is currently employed as a psychologist at the Mood Disorders Service where she completes psychological assessments for diagnostic clarification as well as cognitive-behavioural group therapy. She also completes tasks related to program evaluation within the Mood Disorders Service. Her research interests primarily focus on program evaluation as well as the development, implementation and evaluation of culturally safe assessment and psychotherapeutic processes for Indigenous populations in Canada.

Selected publications:

Rouse, J., McShane, K. E., Usher, A., & Davey, C. J. (in press). Debriefing and research participation. In A. Wenzel (Ed.), The SAGE encyclopedia of abnormal and clinical psychology. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc.

Baskin, C., & Davey, C. J. (2015). Parallel pathways to decolonization: Critical and Indigenous social work. In S. Wehbi & H. Parada (Eds), Re-imagining anti-oppression: Reflecting on practice. Waterloo, ON: Wilfred Laurier University Press.

Key, B., & Davey, C. J. (2015). Interoceptive exposures. In I. Milosevic & R. E. McCabe (Eds.), Phobias: The psychology of irrational fear, an encyclopedia. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO.

Key, B., & Davey, C. J. (2015). Relaxation. In I. Milosevic & R. E. McCabe (Eds.), Phobias: The psychology of irrational fear, an encyclopedia. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO.

Davey, C. J., Landy, M., Pecora, A., Quintero, D., & McShane, K. (2015). A realist review of brief interventions for alcohol misuse delivered in emergency departments. Journal of Systematic Reviews, 45, DOI: 10.1186/s13643-015-0024-4.

McShane, K., Davey, C. J., Rouse, J., Usher, A., & Sullivan, S. (2015). Beyond ethical obligation to research dissemination and utilization: Conceptualizing debriefing as a form of knowledge translation. Canadian Psychology, 56(1), 80-87.

Baskin, C., & Davey, C. J. (2014). Grannies, Elders and friends: Aging Indigenous women in Toronto. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 58(1), 46-65, DOI: 10.1080/01634372.2014.912997.

Davey, C. J., Niccols, A., Henderson, J., Dell, C., Wylie, T., Suave, E, Dobbins, M., & Sword, (2014). Predictors of research use among service providers targeting Aboriginal women with addictions. Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse, 13, 315-336. DOI: 0.1080/15332640.2014.938211.

Adjunct Supervisors

Martin M. Antony, Ph.D., C.Psych., ABPP

Martin M. Antony, Ph.D., ABPP

Director of Research
Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic
St. Joseph’s Healthcare, Hamilton
West 5th Campus

Tel:   416-979-5000, ext. 2631
Fax:  416-599-5660
Email:   mantony@psych.ryerson.ca

Personal Website: www.martinantony.com

Dr. Antony is Professor and Chair in the Department of Psychology at Ryerson University, a past president of the Canadian Psychological Association, and a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.  He also holds faculty appointments at McMaster University (Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences), the University of Toronto (Department of Psychiatry), and the University of Waterloo (Department of Psychology).  Previously, he was based at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton, where he served as Psychologist-in-Chief and Founding Director of both the Anxiety Treatment and Research Centre and the Clinical Psychology Residency Program.  Dr. Antony has published 29 books and more than 175 journal articles and chapters.  He has also been interviewed or quoted by ABC News, Animal Planet, Discovery Channel, Fitness Magazine, National Geographic Channel, O (Oprah) Magazine, Oxygen Magazine, Shape Magazine, Washington Post, Women’s Health, Women’s World, Reader’s Digest, Vitality Magazine, and many other print, radio, and television outlets.

Dr. Antony’s research interests are in the area of anxiety disorders, perfectionism, and cognitive behaviour therapy.  Current projects include a CIHR-funded study on motivational interviewing for severe generalized anxiety disorder, as well as several other projects in the areas of social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and perfectionism.

Selected Publications:

Gee, B.A., Fracalanza, K., & Antony, M.M. (in press).  Behavior therapies (functional analysis, operant conditioning-based strategies, behavioral activation, applied relaxation, social skills training).  In R. Cautin & S.O. Lilienfeld (eds.), Encyclopedia of clinical psychology. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.

Gee, B.A., Nowakowski, M.E., & Antony, M.M. (in press).  Hypochondriasis/Health Anxiety.  In R. Cautin & S.O. Lilienfeld (eds.), Encyclopedia of clinical psychology. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.

Gros, D.F., McCabe, R.E., & Antony, M.M. (in press).  Using a hybrid model to investigate the comorbidity and symptom overlap between social phobia and the other anxiety disorders and unipolar mood disorders.  Psychiatry Research.

Hood, H.K., & Antony, M.M. (in press). Panic disorder.  In J.D. Wright (Ed.), International encyclopedia of the social and behavioral sciences, 2nd ed. Oxford, UK:  Elsevier.

McCabe, R.E., Hood, H.K., & Antony, M.M. (in press).  Anxiety disorders: Social anxiety disorder and specific phobia.  In A. Tasman, J. Lieberman, J. Kay, M. First, & M. Riba (eds.), Psychiatry, 4th ed. Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.  

Nelson, A.L., Vorstenbosch, V., & Antony, M.M. (in press).  Assessing fear of storms and severe weather: Validation of the Storm Fear Questionnaire (SFQ)Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment.

Nowakowski, M.E., & Antony, M.M. (in press). Reactions to teasing in social anxiety.  Cognitive Therapy and Research.

Nowakowski, M.E., Atkey, S.K., & Antony, M.M. (in press).  Self-help/bibliotherapy.  In R. Cautin & S.O. Lilienfeld (eds.), Encyclopedia of clinical psychology. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.

Nowakowski, M.E., Rogojanski, J., & Antony, M.M. (in press).  Specific phobia.  In S.G. Hofmann (Ed.), Wiley handbook of cognitive behavioral therapy. Volume 2: CBT for specific disorders. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.

Rowa, K., McCabe, R.E., Antony, M.M., & Swinson, R.P. (in press).  A preliminary attempt to experimentally induce post-event processing in social anxiety disorder.  Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy.

Rowa, K., Milosevic, I., & Antony, M.M. (in press).  Cognitive-behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder: Applying the approach.  In J.W. Weeks (Ed.), Wiley-Blackwell handbook on social anxiety.  Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.

Vorstenbosch, V., Newman, L., & Antony, M.M. (in press).  Exposure techniques.  In S.G. Hofmann (Ed.), Wiley handbook of cognitive behavioral therapy. Volume 1: CBT general strategies. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.

Antony, M.M. (2014).  Behavior therapy.  In D. Wedding & R.J. Corsini (Eds.), Current psychotherapies (10th ed., pp. 193-229).  Belmont, CA: Cengage Brooks/Cole.

Gee, B.A., Antony, M.M., & Koerner, N. (2013). Disclosure of anxiety in everyday life: Effects of social anxiety.  Personality and Individual Differences, 54, 438-441.

Gee, B.A., Antony, M.M., & Koerner, N. (2013). How do people perceive the disclosure of emotion?  Cognitive Therapy and Research, 37, 579-586.

Gee, B.A., Hood, H.K., & Antony, M.M. (2013).  Anxiety disorders: A historical perspective.  In T.G. Plante (Ed.), Abnormal psychology through the ages, Vol. 2, Disorders and treatments (pp. 31-47).  Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO/Praeger.

Koerner, N., Antony, M.M., Young, L., & McCabe, R.E. (2013).  Changes in beliefs about social competence of self and others following group cognitive-behavioral treatment.  Cognitive Therapy and Research, 37, 256-265.

MacDonald, E.M., Koerner, N., & Antony, M.M. (2013).  Modification of interpretive bias:  Impact on anxiety sensitivity, information processing and response to induced bodily sensations.  Cognitive Therapy and Research, 37, 860-871.

Mathewson, K.J., Schmidt, L.A., Miskovic, V., Santesso, D.L., Duka, E., McCabe, R.E., Antony, M.M., & Moscovitch, D.A. (2013).  Does respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) predict anxiety reduction during cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD)?  International Journal of Psychophysiology, 88, 171-181.

Moscovitch, D.A., Rowa, K., Paulitzky, J.R., Ierullo, M.D., Chiang, B., Antony, M.M., & McCabe, R.E. (2013). Self-portrayal concerns and their relation to safety behaviors and negative affect in social anxiety disorder.  Behaviour Research and Therapy, 51, 476-486.

Mushquash, A.R., Stewart, S.H., Sherry, S.B., Mackinnon, S.P., Antony, M.M., & Sherry, D.L. (2013).  Heavy episodic drinking among dating partners: A longitudinal actor-partner interdependence model.  Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 27, 178-183.

Rowa, K., Hood, H.K., & Antony, M.M. (2013).  Generalized anxiety disorder.  In W.E. Craighead, D.J. Miklowitz, & L.W. Craighead (Eds.), Psychopathology: History, diagnosis, and empirical foundations, 2nd ed. (pp. 108-146).  Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons.

Sherry, S.B., MacKinnon, A.L., Fossum, K., Antony, M.M., Stewart, S.H., Sherry, D.L., Nealis, L.J., & Mushquash, A.R. (2013).  Perfectionism, discrepancies, and depression: Testing the perfectionism social disconnection model in a short-term, four-wave longitudinal study.  Personality and Individual Differences, 54, 692-697.

Van Dam, N.T., Gros, D.F., Earleywine, M., & Antony, M.M. (2013). Establishing a trait anxiety threshold that signals likelihood of anxiety disorders.  Anxiety, Stress, and Coping, 26, 70-86.

Suzanne Archie, M.D., FRCP(C)

Suzanne Archie, M.D., FRCP(C)

Associate Professor
Department of Psychiatry and
Behavioural Neurosciences
Clinical Director
Cleghorn Program:
Early Intervention in Psychosis
Director, Psychotic Disorders Clinic
St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton

Tel: 905-540-6586
Fax: 905 -525-2805
E-Mail: archies@mcmaster.ca

Dr. Suzanne Archie is an Associate Professor with the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. She is a psychiatrist and the Clinical Director of the Cleghorn Program for Early Intervention in Psychosis and Psychotic Disorders Clinic. Her research interests include program evaluation, shared care with primary care health providers, lifestyle changes for antipsychotic induced weight gain, and first episode psychosis research. Currently Dr. Archie is involved in a research project, sponsored by CIHR, to examine pathways to care for immigrants experiencing a first episode of psychosis.

Selected Publications:

Hobbs H, Hamilton-Wilson J, Archie S. The alumni program: Redefining continuity of care in psychiatry. Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 1999; 37: 23-29.

Archie S, Hamilton-Wilson J, Osborne S, Hobbs H. Pilot Study: Access to Fitness Facility and Exercise Levels in Olanzapine Treated Patients. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 2003; 48(8): 355-359.

Hobbs H, Hamilton Wilson J, Archie S. Evaluation of the Alumni Program: A shared care model for psychosis.  Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 2004; 42(1): 28-36.

Archie S, Hamilton Wilson J, Woodward K, Hobbs H, Osborne S, McNiven J.  Psychotic Disorders Clinic and First Episode Psychosis:  A Program Evaluation. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 2005; 50: 46-51. 

Hamilton Wilson J, Hobbs H, Archie S. The Right Stuff for Early Intervention in Psychosis.  Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, June 2005; 43, 6: 22-28.

Archie S, Goldberg J, Akhtar-Danesh N, Landeen J, McColl L and McNiven J. Psychotic Disorders, Eating Habits and Physical Activity: Who is Ready for Lifestyle Changes? Psychiatric Services, February 2007; 58(2): 233-239.

Schmitz N, Malla A, Norman R, Archie S, Zipursky RB. Inconsistency in the relationship between duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and negative symptoms: sorting out the problem of heterogeneity.  Schizophrenia Research July 2007; 93(1-3): 152-9.

Malla A, Schmitz N, Norman R, Archie S, Windell D, Roy P, Zipursky RB. A Multi Site Canadian Study of Outcome of First Episode Psychosis Treated in Publicly Funded Early Intervention Services.  Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 2007 Sep;52(9):563-71.

Archie S, Rush B, Akhtar-Danesh N, Norman R, Malla A, Roy P, Zipursky RB. Substance Use and Abuse in First Episode Psychosis: Prevalence Before and After Early Intervention.  Schizophrenia Bulletin 2007 Nov;33(6):1354-63.

Menezes NM, Malla AK, Norman RM, Archie S, Roy P, Zipursky RB. A multi-site Canadian perspective: Examining the functional outcome from first episode psychosis. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica 2009 Aug;120(2):138-46.

Hamilton Wilson JE, Azzopardi W, Sager S, Gould B, Conroy S, Deegan P, Archie S.  A Narrative Study of the Experiences of Student Nurses Who Have Participated in the Hearing Voices that are Distressing Simulation. International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 2009 Vol. 6: Iss. 1, Art. 19.

Archie S, Gyömörey K. First Episode Psychosis, Substance Abuse and Prognosis: A Systematic Review. Current Psychiatry Reviews Vol 5, No 4, August 2009, 153-163.

Archie S, Akhtar-Danesh N, Norman R, Malla A, Roy P, Zipursky RB. Ethnic diversity and pathways to care for a first episode of psychosis in Ontario. Schizophrenia Bulletin 2010 Jul;36(4):688-701.

Archie S.  Early Detection, Assessment, and Optimal Treatment of a First Episode of Psychosis: Case Study and Commentary. Journal of Clinical Outcomes Management 2010 Jul;17(7):35-50.

McDermid Vaz S, Heinrichs RW, Miles AA, Ammari N, Oman A, Goldberg JO, Archie S. The Canadian Objective Assessment of Life Skills (COALS): A new measure of functional competence in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Bulletin 2011 37, supplement 1: 273.

Archie S, Zangeneh Kazemi A, Akhtar-Danesh N. Concurrent Binge Drinking and Depression among Canadian Youth: Prevalence, Patterns, and the Likelihood of Suicidality.  Alcohol 2012 46(2): 165-172.

Archie S, Boydell KM, Stasiulis E, Volpe T, Gladstone BM. Reflections of young people who have had a first episode of psychosis: What attracted them to use alcohol and illicit drugs? Early Intervention in Psychiatry (available online ahead of print).

Krupa T, Oyewumi K, Archie S, Lawson JT, Nandlal J, Conrad G. Early intervention services for psychosis and time until application for disability support: A survival analysis. Community Mental Health Journal (accepted).

Gary Chaimowitz, M.D., FRCP(C)

Gary Chaimowitz, M.D., FRCP(C)

Head of Service, Forensic Psychiatry Service,
St. Joseph’s Healthcare
Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University

Forensic Psychiatry Service
Centre for Mountain Health Services
St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton
100 West 5th St.
P.O. Box 585
Hamilton, Ontario L8N 3K7
Canada
Tel:  905-522-1155, ext. 36886
E-Mail: chaimow@mcmaster.ca

Dr. Chaimowitz is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University in Hamilton. He is the Head of Service, Forensic Psychiatry at St. Joseph’s Healthcare. In addition to subspecialty psychiatry certification, he has an MBA from the University of Toronto. He has a longstanding interest in First Nations mental health and acts as a consultant psychiatrist to the James Bay Cree communities of Northern Ontario. His continuing medical education activities include organizing the McMaster Muskoka Seminars, now in its 9th year.  He is a member of both the Ontario Review Board and the Consent and Capacity Board. He is secretary both to the Canadian Academy of Psychiatry and the Law as well as the Canadian Psychiatric Association Native Mental Health Section. He is a member of the Canadian Psychiatric Association Professional Standards and Practice Council.  

Susan Chudzik, M.A., C.Psych.

Susan Chudzik, M.A., C.Psych.

Psychologist, Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic
St. Joseph's Healthcare
West 5th Campus

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 35499
Fax: 905-521-6120
E-Mail: schudzik@stjoes.ca

Susan Chudzik is the Comorbidity Team Coordinator for the Anxiety Treatment and Research Centre and the Mood Disorders Service, at St. Joseph’s Healthcare.  In addition, she is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster and is involved in the CBT and psychotherapy training modules of the Psychiatric Residency Program at McMaster University, and the Cognitive Behavioural Sciences Program as a CBT case supervisor and lecturer. Ms. Chudzik earned a Masters of Science degree in Mental Health Counseling from Niagara University in Lewiston, NY.  Her research interests currently focus on the development of optimal treatment protocols for comorbid mood and anxiety disorders.  She has completed several studies examining the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy on comorbid panic and depression.  She is also interested in the relationship between generalized anxiety disorder and major depressive disorder. 

Catherine Dool, M.A.

Catherine Dool, M.A.

Psychometrist, Clinical Neuropsychology Service
St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton
100 West 5th Street
Hamilton, ON L9H 1G9
Canada
Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 36254

E-Mail: cdool@stjoes.ca

Catherine Dool received her M.A. in Clinical Neuropsychology from the University of Windsor (1992). She currently works as a psychometrist in Clinical Neuropsychology Services at St. Joseph’s. She has over twenty years clinical experience working with adolescents and adults with acquired brain injuries.  

Gary Hasey, M.D., FRCP(C)

Gary Hasey, M.D., FRCP(C)

Mood Disorders Program
Centre for Mountain Health Services
St. Joseph's Hospital
100 West 5th St.
P.O. Box 585
Hamilton, Ontario L8N 3K7
Canada
Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 35419
Fax: 905-381-5616
E-Mail: haseyg@mcmaster.ca

Dr. Hasey is a psychiatrist in the Mood Disorders Program at St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University.  He is involved in clinical research projects examining cognitive changes during the course of electroconvulsive therapy treatment (ECT).

Selected Publications:

Hasey, G.M., repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation , in Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs. Bezchlibnyk-Butler K.Z.. and Jeffries JJ, Eds. 18th revision Hofgrefe & Huber, US, Canada, Switzerland, Germany. 2008.

Hasey, G.M., repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation , in Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs. Bezchlibnyk-Butler K.Z.. and Jeffries JJ, Eds. 17th revision Hofgrefe & Huber, US, Canada, Switzerland, Germany. 2007.

Hasey, G.M., repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation , in Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs. Bezchlibnyk-Butler K.Z.. and Jeffries JJ, Eds. 16th revision Hofgrefe & Huber, US, Canada, Switzerland, Germany. 2006.

Hasey, G.M., Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation , in Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs. Bezchlibnyk-Butler K.Z.. and Jeffries JJ, Eds. 15th revision Hofgrefe & Huber, US, Canada, Switzerland, Germany. 2005.

Milev R, Abraham G, Hasey G, Cabaj JL Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Treatment of Medication-Resistant Depression in Older Adults: A Case Series. J ECT. 2008 Jul 23.

MacQueen G. Parkin C. Marriott M. Begin H. Hasey G. The long-term impact of treatment with electroconvulsive therapy on discrete memory systems in patients with bipolar disorder. Journal of Psychiatry & Neuroscience. 2007 Jul, 32(4):241-9.

Fregni F, Marcolin MA , Myczkowski M, Amiaz R, Hasey G, Rumi DO, Rosa M, Rigonatti SP, Camprodon J, Walpoth M, Heaslip M, Grunhaus, L, Hausmann L, Pascual-Leone A. Predictors of antidepressant response in clinical trials of transcranial magnetic stimulation. International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 2006 Dec;9(6):641-54. 

Michael Mosher, B.Sc.

Michael Mosher, B.Sc.

Psychometrist, Clinical Neuropsychology Service
St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton
100 West 5th Street
Hamilton, ON L8N 3K7

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 36386
E-Mail: mmosher@stjoes.ca

Richard P. Swinson, MD, FRCPC, FRCPsych, FCPA

Richard P. Swinson, MD, FRCPC, FRCPsych, FCPA

Professor Emeritus
Dept Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences McMaster University
Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic
St Josephs Healthcare, Hamilton

Anxiety Treatment & Research Clinic
West 5th Campus

Tel: 905-522-1155, ext. 34964
Fax: 905-521-6120
E-Mail: swinsonr@mcmaster.ca

Currently a psychiatrist of the Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic, St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton and Professor Emeritus in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario.  His clinical practice is focused upon anxiety and related disorders with an emphasis on OCD and related disorders.  Has published approximately 200 peer reviewed papers, 10 books, and 40 chapters mainly on the subjects of anxiety disorders and substance dependence.  His current research activity is funded by Canadian Fund for Innovation, Ontario Research Development Fund and Canadian Institutes of Health Research. This last is a 5 year study in the field of Knowledge Mobilization that seeks to investigate methods of influencing the uptake of treatment for mood and anxiety disorders in young adults.

He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, Fellow of the Royal College of Psychiatrists UK and inaugural Fellow of the Canadian Psychiatric Association.

Immediate past Chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Morgan Firestone Chair in Psychiatry and Chief of Psychiatry at St. Joseph’s Hospital Hamilton, from 1997-2006. 

Profile

  • Dr. Swinson achieved his MBChB in Liverpool (1963), his Diploma in Psychological Medicine (UK) (1966), MD (by thesis) Liverpool (1970), Member of the Royal College of Psychiatrists (UK) (1972), Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians Canada (1973) and Fellow of the Royal College of Psychiatrists (UK) (1980).
  • He was appointed Lecturer in Psychiatry, University of Liverpool; Honorary Senior Registrar, United Liverpool Hospitals and Rainhill Hospital (1969-72); Senior Fellow in Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto (1972-73); Staff Psychiatrist and Assistant Professor, University of Toronto (1974-75) being promoted to Associate Professor (1976) and subsequently to Professor.
  • In 1975 he was a staff psychiatrist at the Toronto General Hospital, becoming Clinical Director of the department (1981-90). He developed one of the first Behaviour Therapy Clinics in Canada (1975-90) and became Director of the Anxiety Disorders Clinic (1980-90) and Staff Psychiatrist at Toronto Western Hospital (1989-90).

Dr. Swinson's administrative responsibilities have included chairing the Board of Examiners for the Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, and the Examination Board in Psychiatry for the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.  He is currently the Chair of the Specialty Committee for Psychiatry, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, and is Chair of the Professional Advisory Board for the Canadian Psychiatric Research Foundation (CPRF).  He serves as a member of a number of research review committees including the Canadian Institutes of Health, the CPRF), and the National Institutes of Health USA. 

Post-Doctoral Fellows in Psychology

Eleanor Donegan
Elizabeth Pawluk 
Christie Yao 

2016/2017 Residents

Karen Auyeung
University of British Columbia, Vancouver

Karen Zhang
Western University, London

Katherine Holshausen
Queen's University, Kingston

Rose Robbins
University of Ottawa

Linette Savage
University of Calgary

Meredith Landy
Ryerson University, Toronto

2015/2016 Residents

Maya Gupta 
Queen's University, Kingston 

Matthew King 
Ryerson University, Toronto

Danielle MacDonald 
Ryerson University, Toronto

Phillippe Shnaider
Ryerson University, Toronto 

Megan Short 
Lakehead University, Thunder Bay 

Skye Stephens
Ryerson University, Toronto

2014/2015 Residents

Gillian Alcolado
Concordia University, Montreal 

Caitlin Davey 
Ryerson University, Toronto

Eleanor Donegan 
Concordia University, Montreal 

Nicholas Farrell 
University of Wyoming 

Elmar Gardizi 
University of Windsor

Stephanie Waecther 
University of Waterloo

2013/2014 Residents

Alana Cook 
Simon Fraser University, British Columbia

Heather Hood
Ryerson University, Toronto

Matilda Nowakowski
Ryerson University, Toronto

Allison Ouimet
Concordia University, Montreal

Marta Statucka 
City University New York

Rachel Vella-Zarb 
York University, Toronto

2012/2013 Residents

Kathryn Byars
City University New York

Sabrina Demetrioff
Dalhousie University

Amrita Ghai
York University

Corrie Goldfinger
Queen's University

Jennifer Trew
University of British Columbia

Elena Ballantyne
Adler School of Professional Psychology

2011/2012 Residents

Mariyam Ahmed
York University

Tali Boritz
York University

Naomi Gryfe-Saperia
University of Western Ontario

Christian Maile
City University New York

2010/2011 Residents

Noah Lazar
University of Western Ontario

Joelle LeMoult
University of Miami

Jill Matusek
Miami University 

Irena Milosevic
Concordia University